Posts

A Comprehensive Guide to Purchasing a Reliable Business Car

Many people need a car for transportation for their business. Whether you’re an employee who is expected to drive to clients or a self-employed person who needs a vehicle to complete their job, there are many reasons to buy a business car. Some will need to travel long distances, while others only drive sporadically.

The question is, how do you choose the right car for your business? How do you know you’re buying a vehicle that will be reliable and cost-efficient. Let’s take a look, in this comprehensive guide to purchasing a reliable business car.

Mileage Is Key

Assuming you are a business owner and someone who is going to be paying for this vehicle yourself, mileage is key. There are a few things to consider here. Firstly, the kind of driving you will be doing. If you are zipping about a metropolitan area with lots of stop-start driving, you want something designed for being efficient in the city. If you are cruising along freeways for much of your driving, then something more efficient on long, higher-speed runs is more important.

Secondly, you may wish to look for a hybrid or electric vehicle. These vehicles tend to have a higher MPG rating than full-fuel cars. They may, however, be more expensive than their fuel-based counterparts. Work out what is best for your business now and in the long run.

New vs Used

Often, people turn their noses up at the thought of buying a used car. However, it’s not always a bad idea! It can be extremely cost-effective and, if you purchase your vehicle from the right place, just as reliable and safe as purchasing a brand new motor.

There are some great pre-owned programs out there. In fact, according to Holman INFINITI “Certified Pre-Owned vehicles combine true peace of mind with the exceptional experience of owning an INFINITI at a pre-owned value.” The certification process of pre-owned vehicles means that you are buying a car that meets strict criteria, has a warranty, and has been looked after by experts. Buying this way could save your business a huge chunk of money and leave you feeling confident about your purchase.

Think of Your Comfort

There is one thing that you should definitely be thinking about when purchasing a new vehicle for business and that is your comfort. Assuming that you will be in this vehicle for multiple hours every week, you don’t want to be uncomfortable! Even if you’re only hopping in your vehicle 3-4 times a week, you still don’t want that to be the worst part of your working week. Take time to ensure you are purchasing a car that suits your size, your comfort, and your needs.

Warranties & Services

Purchasing a car is just the first piece of the puzzle. Once you own a vehicle, you will need to look after it. It’s worth checking out various dealers and brands to see what kind of warranties and ongoing services they provide. Servicing a car can be extremely expensive without any kind of deal in place, so look for a dealer that offers a long-term warranty or ongoing service scheme. This may be reflected in the price of the car but should work out cheaper in the long run.

How Much Space Do You Need?

There are many different reasons to buy a car for your business. Maybe you’re a therapist or masseuse, meaning you travel to clients with a lot of equipment. On the other hand, you could be a designer who simply needs to travel to meetings quickly with minimal gear. Whichever side of the scale you fall on should reflect the size of the car you are looking for. There’s no way you’re fitting a massage table in a 3-door city car!

Add-Ons

Finally, you should always speak to an expert dealer when purchasing your car to figure out what add-ons and tech you may require in the vehicle. If you’re likely to spend lots of time on the phone when driving, you’ll need to ensure that you have Bluetooth connectivity. If you expect to spend a lot of time driving long distances, a cruise control function could come in handy. On top of that, there are plenty of extras that will simply make your driving experience far more enjoyable.

Once you have factored each of these points into the equation you will be able to make an informed decision about what kind of business vehicle is right for you. There are plenty of new and used car dealerships that you can take this information to, then you can allow them to help you find the right car based on your priorities.

Principal Solar Provides Status Update of eTruck Transportation

DALLAS, TEXAS, SEPTEMBER 23, 2021 – McapMediaWire Principal Solar Inc. (OTC Pink: PSWW) (“Principal” or “the Company”), a strategic investor in and acquirer of technologies that support next-generation opportunities in renewable, and clean energy sectors as well as an investor in and acquirer and operator of undervalued petroleum-producing properties, today announced that eTruck Transportation (“eTruck”) is on schedule with the development and planned availability of its class 6 hybrid heavy electric vehicle demonstration vehicles, both of which are planned for Q4 of 2021.

“Our investment in eTruck Transportation is performing as anticipated,” said K. Bryce “Rick” Toussaint, CPA, MBA, Chairman and CEO of PSWW. “eTruck is on schedule for a Q4 completion of its two initial vehicle conversions for customer evaluation and plans to accept commercial orders in the same quarter.”

A video of eTruck’s Class 8 demonstration vehicle is viewable here.

eTruck’s heavy vehicle EV conversion technology is engineered to enable transportation and logistics companies of all sizes to cost-effectively transition their existing fleets from diesel to high performance hybrid electric fleets without waiting for major truck manufacturers to engineer completely new platforms. eTruck’s proprietary system lowers operational costs, reduces fuel consumption and emissions, thus enabling diesel fleets to transition towards electric power, without sacrificing performance, range, or utility.

Principal Solar, via its Nexteal subsidiary, is strategically investing in emerging electric vehicle technologies that are ready for near-term commercial rollout, thereby meeting today’s market demand with timely, cost-effective, and environmentally-friendly solutions.

About Principal Solar

Principal Solar is a strategic investor in and acquirer of technologies that support next-generation opportunities in traditional, renewable, and clean energy sectors as well as an acquirer of undervalued petroleum-producing properties.

For further information, please visit the Company’s website at www.pswwenergy.com

Safe Harbour Statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995

The statements contained in this news release which are not historical facts may be “forward-looking statements” that involve risks and uncertainties which could cause actual results to differ materially from those currently anticipated. For example, statements that describe PSWW’ hopes, plans, objectives, goals, intentions, or expectations are forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements made herein are only made as of the date of this news release. Numerous factors, many of which are beyond PSWWs’ control, will affect actual results. PSWW undertakes no obligation to publicly update such forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances. This news release should be read in conjunction with PSWWs’ most recent financial reports and other filings posted with the OTC Markets and/or the United States Securities and Exchange Commission by PSWW.

Principal Solar Contact

K. Bryce “Rick” Toussaint, CPA, MBA
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Email: [email protected]
Tel: 346-396-4210

Investor Relations Contact

Michael Briola

Email: [email protected]

The concept of reference of the carrier in terms of CMR insurance

As a result of the increase in the transportation of goods between countries by road, international regulations have been made to resolve conflicts on this issue and the need of determine the principles and rules of transportation has emerged. The aforementioned developments, the CMR Convention Convention, which contains general legal rules regarding the transportation of goods by land between countries, was signed in 1956 and came into force in 1961.Turkey agreed to join the additional protocol to CMR and CMR with the Law No. 3939 published in the Official Gazette dated 14.12.1993 and numbered 21788.

With the came into force of the convention, the rights and obligations of the carrier, the sender, the consignee or the right holder as the parties of the contract of carriage have been determined, and by whom and how the damage occurred in cases such as damage of the transported goods, partial or total loss, late delivery by exceeding the transportation period. Issues such as calculating the compensation to be paid are regulated and taken under provision

** With this type of insurance, the liability of the carrier, which is a party to a carriage contract to which the CMR is applied, is guaranteed as both the policy owner and the insured. However, in CMR insurance, every situation that causes the liability of the carrier is not included in the scope of risk. It is necessary to look at the relevant CMR Insurance policy guarantees, clauses and special conditions for each time. The other side of the CMR insurance contract is the policyholder. The insurant is the person who transfers the risk he bears to the insurer in return for the premium, that is, the “carrier” who carries out a transportation business subject to the provisions of the CMR. The insured is the person on whom the risk is incurred or on the property. Generally, in insurance contracts, the policy owner and the insured are the same person.

CMR Insurance, which is one of the liability insurance types that aims to prevent the decrease in the assets of the insured in order to compensate for the damages that may arise from the damages that the insured may cause to third parties; It aims to guarantee the risk undertaken by the carrier due to the transportation business in the transportations subject to the Convention on the International Carriage of Goods by Land (CMR). For this, at least one of the states of commencement or completion of the transport must be a party to the CMR convention.

Shipments of the carrier covered by the insurer under the CMR Insurance; damage to the goods, loss and defect or deficiency in transportation vehicles, damages arising from the faults of those assigned by the insured carrier and other risks specified in the CMR Insurance Policy. The protection provided by the CMR insurance contract will begin with the conclusion of the insurance contract or the payment of the first insurance premium.

The concept of subrogation originates from the Turkish Commercial Code; specifically TTK 1472 ”When the insurer pays the insurance indemnity, he legally replaces with the insured. If the insured has the right to file a lawsuit against those responsible for the damage occurred, this right passes to the insurer up to the amount he indemnifies. If a lawsuit or proceeding has been initiated against those responsible, the insurer may continue the lawsuit or proceeding from where it left off, by proving the payment it has made to the insured, pursuant to the Subrogation rule, without the need for the approval of the court or the other party” However, the point that should not be confused here, is the Commodity Transport Insurer of the cargo owner/sender. In other words, when a commodity is damaged or lost during transportation, the cargo insurer will have the right of subrogation against the carrier and its CMR Insurer after the cargo owner has compensated for the loss.

In the decision of the 11th LAW DEPARTMENT of the Supreme Court E. 2003/5045 K. 2004/271 T. 15.1.2004 He summarised the conditions for the formation of the concepts of Recourse and Succession in Transport Insurances. In order for the insurer to have a Right of Succession, the existence of an insurance contract, the fact that the insurer has made a payment to the insurant based on this contract, and that the insured has the right to sue the insurer against the person who harmed him, must be present. All conditions must be present at the same time.

The main legal consequences of the insurer’s succession are:

  1. A new right does not arise as a result of succession; transfer of an existing right to a new creditor (insurer). The insured’s right to claim compensation against the person who caused the damage is transferred to the insurer.
  2. The insured is obliged to provide the insurer with all available evidence and necessary information regarding the claim in question.
  3. The insured person is not responsible for the existence of the claim nor the solvency of the person responsible.
  4. The claim for compensation is transferred with the statute of limitations existing/subjected. Therefore, the statute of limitations neither begins with the succession nor is it interrupted by the succession.
  5. The claim for compensation is transferred to the insurer, together with all objection and defence rights of the party responsible for the damage against the insured person.

(Graber, VVG Art. 72, Rn. 26-30; Sieber/ Hüsser, VVG Art. 72, Rn. 43; Oftinger/ Stark, § 11,)

In the event that the subject of the insurance is damaged due to the action of a third party and any of the dangers covered by the coverage, without any fault, negligence or violation of the policy terms of the insured, the insurer becomes the owner of all legal receivables by replacing the insured, after paying the damage to the insured. It is the situation where the insurer subrogate to those who caused the damage, demanding an amount equal to the compensation paid by replacing the insured.

Like this; In property and liability insurance, the insured is prevented from claiming double compensation from both the insurance company and the person or institutions that caused the damage. However, in order for the right of recourse to arise; The damage must be covered by the guarantee and must not have been done intentionally by the insured.

In the Convention, while the responsibility of the carrier on the transported goods is broadly expressed, from the time of receipt of the goods from the sender to the moment of delivery to the sent or right owner, at the same time, general and special reasons that will allow the carrier to get rid of responsibility are also revealed in detail.

In the CMR contract, the liability of the carrier manifests itself as a narrowed strict liability, in addition to the fault of the carrier, in case of the fault of the sender, the consignee, the beneficiary or their assistants or employees involved in the transportation process, the carrier will be freed from the liability of compensation for damage arising from the goods at the rate of the detected defect. As such, it has been tried to ensure a balance of rights and interests between the parties of the contract of carriage in the provisions of the convention contract. This, in fact, regulates the recourse or non-recourse of the right holders or their insurers against the CMR Insurer due to the damage or loss on the transported goods.

The carrier cannot be held liable if the goods that are wasted or damaged due to their characteristics are not packaged or are incorrectly packaged when they are not packaged or poorly packaged. The responsibility of the carrier may not be mentioned in case of damage during the loading and stowing of the goods by the sender, the recipient or the persons acting on their behalf, but in these cases, the burden of proof is on the carrier in determining the damage liability. Again, the carrier will not be held liable, especially in case of damage to the goods that can be damaged partially or completely by breakage, rusting, rot, drying, normal fire or moth and vermin, and in cases such as insufficient or incorrect brand or numbers on the boxes or packages. While such situations are not subject to the responsibility of the carrier in terms of the CMR Convention, we can also accept them as the situations where the insurer does not guarantee and will not pay compensation to the damaged cargo persons in terms of CMR Insurances.

Both the CMR convention contract and the provisions of the TCC numbered 6102 accept that the carrier has an obligation of protection, surveillance, inspection and control over the transported goods, and that the transported goods are damaged, partially or completely lost due to the carrier’s failure to fulfil these obligations as a prudent carrier with the utmost care. It has been accepted that the carrier is directly responsible for the compensation of this damage, if the results such as late delivery by exceeding the transportation period and damage occur. These provisions of the convention on the framework of the responsibility of the carrier within the scope of the transportation process from the moment of receipt of the goods to the moment of delivery are of an imperative nature, and it will not be possible for the parties to agree on the mitigation or removal of this responsibility.

In order to reveal the responsibility of the carrier due to the goods transported in accordance with the regulations of the CMR convention, the carrier has not fulfilled its duty to protect, watch, control and seize the goods with the utmost care, such as a prudent carrier, as a result of which the goods are damaged, lost or delayed. It is necessary to determine the existence of a causal link between the damage to the goods and the violation of the carrier’s obligation to protect the goods. In practice, the Court of Cassation decides that the fault is shared between the sender and the carrier in cases where the carrier neglects its supervision responsibility and that recourse will be made at the rate of this sharing.

Another important issue in the responsibility of the carrier on the transported goods is that if the goods are damaged, partially or completely lost due to the fault of the carrier’s assistants and employees, the persons whose services are used, and if the damage occurs, such as late delivery by exceeding the transportation period and the damage occurs. The carrier will be liable as the existence of the defect. In this context, the carrier will be considered directly responsible in case of damage to the transported goods due to all faulty behaviours, especially negligence and intent, of these persons included in the transportation process by the carrier. Of course, here again, the existence of an appropriate and convenient causal link between the faulty actions or actions of the employees, men or persons whose services are used and the damage to the goods shall also be sought.

In case of damage to the transported goods, the liability of the carrier for compensation of damage will now be revealed, with the determination of the responsibility of the carrier. In this case, the carrier shall be liable to pay the compensation to be calculated according to the market price of the place where the goods are received for transport, according to the market price in the absence of the exchange price, and objectively according to the comparable values of the goods of the same type and nature, if the market price cannot be determined. Therefore, if the transported goods are damaged during the transportation process, the difference between the undamaged value and the damaged value will be compensated at the time and place of receipt for transportation. An upper limit has been imposed on the compensation amount to be paid by the carrier in this case, pursuant to the CMR contract and the provisions of the TCC. In case the transported goods are damaged within the scope of the transportation activity, it is accepted that the carrier is responsible for the missing gross weight of the whole of the goods in case of complete damage, and of the damaged part in case of partial damage, with 8.33 SDR calculation unit for each kilogram.

Since the provisions of both the CMR and the TCC regarding this liability are of an imperative nature, agreements and provisions regarding the removal or mitigation of this liability by the parties of the contract of carriage will be deemed invalid, will not have any consequences and will not bind the contract parties or third parties. On the other hand, besides the fact that it is not possible to mitigate or remove the carrier’s responsibility, it is accepted that the agreements and provisions regarding increasing this liability or raising the upper limit will also be valid. Again, in the event that the carrier itself or its employees cause damage to the goods with intent, fault equivalent to intent, reckless actions, the carrier will not be able to benefit from the provisions regarding the limitation of liability and will be liable for covering all the damage.

Another controversial issue in practice is the liability of the carrier, who is the CMR Insured, during road transport due to traffic accidents that are not at fault. SUPREME COURT 11. LAW OFFICE. 2016/7990K. In its decision dated 4.4.2018 T. 2018/2393 It has been ruled that “…the driver of the defendant carriers is faultless in the traffic accident, the fault lies entirely with the driver of the opposite vehicle, but the fault of the driver of the carrier in the traffic accident cannot relieve the carrier from contractual liability”.

The person who can claim compensation from the CMR Insurer in case of damage, loss or delay of the transported goods is the person sent or written as the rightful owner in the transport document. In order to be able to claim compensation, it is not necessary for the sent or right owner to have actually suffered damage or to receive the goods. In the lawsuits to be filed due to the damage caused by the transported goods, one and three year statute of limitations are stipulated in terms of both the CMR convention and the provisions of the TCC. In general, the statute of limitations for claims arising from transportation activities carried out within the scope of TCC and CMR Conventions is 1 (one) year. However, if the damage, loss or delay in the goods is caused by intent, fault equivalent to intent, gross fault or reckless acts, the statute of limitations is accepted as 3 (three) years.

In addition, the transportation fee, customs duty and other costs incurred due to the transportation activity will be compensated by the carrier in proportion to the calculated damage. It is also possible to demand interest on the compensation to be paid by the carrier in case the transported goods are damaged. The indemnity creditor will also have an appraisal of approximately 5 percent for the remittance or payable from the beneficiary.

As a result, it should be noted that the purpose of determining the liability of the carrier for damage and loss arising from the transportation of cargo within the framework of the CMR Convention is that the situations that the carrier is responsible or not responsible for are also valid for the CMR Insurer.

Challenges remain for Industrials, but calculus shifts

Disruption arising from COVID-19 has accelerated trends already apparent in the industrials market – particularly digitalisation and trade volatility – and transformation has gone from a “nice to have” to a necessity, according to the latest findings from Baker McKenzie. The law firm surveyed 700 company leaders in six industrial sub-sectors in early 2020, and again at the end of the year after the pandemic had taken hold of the global economy.

Interviews with sector leaders highlighted renewed action and energy, with companies looking to acquire technology and reimagine systems, networks and services to thrive in future. A License to be Bold: Transforming Industrials covers four areas of focus: adapting to the new market; digitalising for growth; disruption-proofing supply chains; and sustainability.

Nikolaus Reinhuber, Global Chair of Baker McKenzie’s Industrials, Manufacturing and Transportation industry group says, “Our findings show that disruption arising from COVID-19 has accelerated trends already apparent in the market –– particularly digitalisation, trade volatility and the importance of sustainability –– and transformation has gone from “nice to have” to necessity. There is a significant imperative to change, with greater stakeholder buy in and long-term viability outweighing short-term performance.

“Those organisations that meet disruption with a bold and innovative vision and execute effectively on it, will be best placed to adapt and grow over the coming decades. The industry has an imperative to change and a new license to be bold –– the stage is set for transformation.”

A License to be Bold: Transforming Industrials

Deloitte announces senior partner appointments

Deloitte has announced the appointment of two senior partners, Hannah Routh and Charlotte Warburton, to strengthen the firm’s global climate change and transport services. Hannah Routh brings 25 years’ experience in the climate change and sustainability sector. Previously a partner with Deloitte China, Hannah was responsible for the Climate Change and Sustainability Advisory practice for Deloitte Asia Pacific. In her new role with Deloitte UK she will be responsible for building the existing team to deliver climate change, decarbonisation and net zero projects for private and public sector clients.

Hannah said: “We see the 2020s as the climate change decade and in response we are expanding the services we provide to organisations in order to support them on their net zero journey. We are committed to doing high quality and rigorous work that makes a positive impact. After 13 years living and working in China, I’m pleased to have come back to the UK at such a pivotal time. As the UK government prepares to host COP26 in November 2021, now is the time for organisations to look urgently at how climate change commitments can be met and the transformation that needs to take place.”

Charlotte Warburton joins Deloitte’s public sector practice as the consulting transport leader, following five years at PA Consulting Group advising global transport, travel and logistics companies, as well as leading their Rail group. She has previously worked on a number of large scale innovation programmes, both in the UK and in the Middle East. A transport and technology specialist, Charlotte will be responsible for growing the firm’s transport consulting practice across the UK and Europe, with a special emphasis on the building the firm’s offering in the North of England. Through national transformation Charlotte will focus on helping companies to achieve their net zero climate targets.

Charlotte commented: “I am looking forward to helping organisations use technology to make better business decisions and to achieve their net zero goals through digital solutions. Being from the North myself, a key objective will be to transform transport infrastructure in the regions as we continue to support the UK’s levelling up agenda.”

Hogan Lovells helps Uber regain its London licence

Hogan Lovells has secured a major win for its client Uber, securing the firm’s right to continue operating in London.

Following a three-day hearing at Westminster Magistrates’ Court earlier this month, the judge this week upheld the ride-hailing company’s appeal against Transport for London, finding Uber “to be a fit and proper person to hold a London PHV operator’s licence.” Deputy Chief Magistrate Ikram also noted the company’s efforts to improve its processes and its introduction of industry leading systems.

Uber first secured a five-year licence in May 2012 and sought a renewal in 2017. TfL refused to renew and Uber, represented by Hogan Lovells, appealed to the chief magistrate, who granted it a 15-month licence in June 2018, subject to various conditions.

In November 2019 London’s transport operator refused to grant a renewal saying that Uber was not “fit and proper” to hold the licence. Uber was allowed to continue operating in the capital while the appeal was underway.

The latest decision secures the firm’s right to continue operating in London, having been granted an 18-month licence.

The Hogan Lovells legal team representing Uber was led by Charles Brasted and also included Julia Marlow, Andrew Eaton, Dervla Simm, Telha Arshad and Louis Biggs.