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Pinsent Masons announces new partnership with World Athletics

Pinsent Masons yesterday announced its appointment by World Athletics as their first official supplier of legal services. The appointment was made after a detailed tender process and is for the next four years.

Drawing on their multinational network of over 100 specialist professionals within their business of sport advisory group, Pinsent Masons will provide legal support, advice and strategic guidance to World Athletics on a global basis. The scope of areas covered will include regulatory and governance, commercial rights, negotiation and arbitration, intellectual property, insurance, employment, brand protection, dispute resolution and technology.

“Our world is changing rapidly, even more so with the current pandemic, and we need nimble and forward-thinking partners to help us make the most of the opportunities this will present.” ~ Sebastian Coe, World Athletics President 

The firm will also provide a full range of legal support around World Athletics’ major events and deliver guidance and training to assist the sport’s administrators around the world.

Commenting on the partnership Sebastian Coe, World Athletics President said: “In many ways, this agreement represents our ambitions for our sport as a global powerhouse. We will need Pinsent’ skillset in a number of areas as we build athletics around the world and I’m delighted that they also see the value in this relationship. Our world is changing rapidly, even more so with the current pandemic, and we need nimble and forward-thinking partners to help us make the most of the opportunities this will present. Like us, they see innovation as a key component of success.

“Their global presence will allow us to access their services wherever we are, which is particularly useful for an organisation with 214 Member Federations and major events staged across the world, and their expertise will help us to maintain world best practice in our governance and commercial relationships.”

Head of Sports at Pinsent Masons, Trevor Watkins said: “We are thrilled to have won this appointment and very much look forward to an exciting and dynamic partnership with World Athletics. It’s a tremendous achievement for our team to have been chosen and, after such a competitive process, is recognition of the global strength and expertise of our specialist lawyers.

“We believe we have a strong synergy with World Athletics in its desire to be the best example of a well governed sports federations, particularly in areas of governance, regulation, integrity and innovation. That message really rings true to us as a firm that embraces innovation, technology and strategic thinking. We’ve had a tremendous response from our multinational network of offices to the prospect of this agreement and the opportunity to work with a sport that our team finds inspirational on many levels. Many of the team are members of running clubs and participate as volunteers within sport and this partnership will allow them to combine their existing passion for the sport and their professional expertise.”

City law firm RPC comments on Saracens fine

During November, the Premiership Rugby fined UK Rugby champions Saracens with a 35 point deduction and £5.36 million for breaching salary cap rules.

Commenting on the Premiership Rugby’s decision and its wider impact on the sports industry, Jeremy Drew, Head of the Commercial Practice at the City law firm RPC said:

“The biggest surprise from a legal perspective is the severity of the sanction – simply because it is unprecedented for the Premiership. Saracens will no doubt have technical arguments around possible precedents for co-investments in relation to the cap, but as is the case with rules in a number of sports, the regulations are purposefully written to preserve the spirit of the rules not just the letter. A good example is Leeds United’s sanction for Spygate which focussed on a breach of the duty to act in good faith to other clubs, rather than an express obligation not to spy.

The case is a timely reminder that the objectives of the regulations are of critical importance, as is clear by the express obligation on the Salary Cap Manager to notify Premiership Rugby of any potential loopholes / lacunae and the clear references to the general principles of the regulations.

The big hurdle for the club now is its challenge of the Disciplinary Panel’s decision which will not take place as an appeal, but will challenge the decision in a form consistent with a Judicial Review (as is standard in many sports related arbitrations). Consequently the bar that Saracens has to reach to overturn the decision is a challenging one.”

If you would like to find out more information, please visit: https://www.rpc.co.uk/

Advisory Excellence is fundraising for Get Kids Going!

Advisory Excellence is raising funds for Get Kids Going! on the JustGiving website and would appreciate our readers’ support. JustGiving is a global online social platform for giving. Donating through JustGiving is simple, fast and secure. Your details are safe with JustGiving – they’ll never sell them or send unwanted emails. Once you donate, they’ll send your money directly to the charity. So it’s the most efficient way to donate – saving time and cutting costs.

Get Kids Going! is a national charity which gives disabled children and young people – up to the age of 26 yrs – the wonderful opportunity of participating in sport. We provide them with specially built sports’ wheelchairs so they can do: athletics, marathons, tennis, skiing, rugby, sailing, boccia, basketball, sledge hockey, table tennis, fencing, shooting, archery, powerlifting and many more sports. Get Kids Going! inspires British disabled youngsters to compete in sporting events, from start to Paralympic level, by also giving them sports grants to help with their; training, physiotherapy, travel, competition fees, design and development of sports’ equipment etc. With your help many can become world record holders and Paralympic champions!

Our aim is to give support to all our budding Paralympians in the build up to the 2020 Tokyo Summer Paralympics, the 2022 Beijing Winter Paralympics and many more such events. Like any aspiring athletes all our youngsters need long-term support, often over many years, to achieve their sporting dreams. Sadly, we are aware of cuts in funding for such youngsters from the government and other sources, and so many of our youngsters are forced to rely on friends and family for financial help. As you can imagine, this causes enormous burdens on many, already cash strapped, families and a constant worry as the cost of participating in their favourite sport is forever increasing.

There are hundreds of talented, disabled, youngsters who have the potential to participate in events throughout the UK and all over the world but receive either none or very little funding and are desperate to achieve their life-long sporting dreams. With your help, together we can turn their dreams into reality and help make them into sporting heroes!

Not only does Get Kids Going! focus on helping disabled young athletes but it also provides manual wheelchairs for children to use every day; at home, at school, and to enable them to play with their friends. These are our wonderful athletes of the future! We believe that all disabled children and young people should receive the right equipment to get them going!

We support children with all disabilities and from all backgrounds. We take pride in ensuring that any equipment which is out grown is recycled to other children, so our supporters’ valuable donations are never wasted. Many people who support Get Kids Going! feel a marvellous sense of achievement and satisfaction. They see that even the smallest donation makes an amazing difference! Get Kids Going! gives disabled children and young people the chance of a life time, freedom, and many wonderful opportunities that you and I take for granted. Opportunities they may never have without you and the support of Get Kids Going! No other charity in the UK focuses on helping disabled children and young people with sport in the same way.

The cost of a bespoke sports wheelchair is about £4,000. A lightweight manual wheelchair is around £3,000. All are designed individually, and perform just like a Formula 1 Racing Car!

The cost of a sports grant can be anything from £500 to £15,000 per year for each youngster.

In general there are over 200,000 disabled children and young people in Britain who need the help of Get Kids Going!

Help us turn their dreams into reality!

Potential economic impact of the Rugby World Cup

Building on previous studies for the Rugby World Cup (RWC) 2003 in Australia, RWC 2007 in France and an advance study for RWC 2011 in New Zealand, we used our major event economic impact methodology to estimate the potential impact of a future RWC on a set of potential Host Nations.

Our report provided a thorough analysis of the possible economic gains a future RWC could lead to in various Host Nations. It outlined the generic economic benefits to a country of hosting a major event such as this and provided contextual data for the impact associated with other similar international sports events.

Using our tried and testing methodology for assessing the potential impact of major sports events, we estimated the direct and indirect economic impact of a RWC on the major rugby regions by building a model for each country.

For each region (including Western Europe, SANZAR, and for developing rugby nations) we also identified regional factors that could affect the level of economic impact. Our analysis incorporated the possible contribution of a Host Country’s government via taxation.

The report continues to provide important support to Host Unions and Governments when deciding whether to bid for future RWCs.

“Deloitte’s Rugby World Cup economic impact study was excellent. Deloitte have a real insight into major events and showed rigour in assessing the economic impact that the Rugby World Cup has on host nations.~ Robert Brophy, Head of Finance, World Rugby

SPORTS PHOTO

Is there a link between playing sports and success in business?

What do a disproportionate number of CEOs have in common? They played sports when they were younger.

Former Whole Foods CEO Walter Robb was the captain of the Stanford Soccer Team. Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan played rugby at Brown. Even Mark Zuckerberg was a high school fencing star.

But according to a series of Ernst & Young studies, it is even more common for female executives to have played a sport.

Ernst & Young surveyed 821 high-level executives and found that a whopping 90% of women played sports. Among women currently holding a C-suite position, this proportion rose to 96%.

In high school, Meg Whitman, CEO of Hewlett-Packard, was the captain of the swim team and also played varsity lacrosse, tennis and basketball. At Princeton University she played NCAA squash and lacrosse. In her book “The Power of Many,” Whitman writes: “I liked team sports the best. When I’m pulling a business team together, I still use those basketball aphorisms I learned as a young person: ‘Let’s pass the ball around a little before game time.’ ‘Do we need man-to-man or zone defense?'”

There are a few reasons why playing sports may boost your odds of business success.

Athletics builds character

Sports keep you physically and mentally healthy, teach you important relationship skills and forge determination. These benefits often spill over into the business world.

Sporting organisations help with networking

The NCAA has a robust career center. Wall Street’s “Lacrosse Mafia” recruits All-American players at staggering rates. You can even scroll through the 42 best lacrosse players on Wall Street.

Northwestern sociologist Lauren Rivera notes that hiring rates increase the most among candidates who played “sports that have a strong presence at Ivy League schools as well as pay-to-play club sports, such as lacrosse, field hockey, tennis, squash and crew.”

Sports often reflect privilege

It may not be that playing sports causes someone to become more of a leader; instead, the truth may be that people who are already competitive and have leadership potential are drawn to sports as kids. They and their families are also often more likely to be affluent, since participation on so many teams requires significant cash outlays.

Sports consume time, energy and resources that many families cannot spare. People who are well-off are more likely to play sports, as well as become CEOs. If you can afford fencing lessons, your child’s odds of becoming a CEO are already quite good.

But why are women in the C-suite more likely to have played sports than their male counterparts?

It might be that sports encourage women to break gender norms, something that is often required for them to reach executive positions in the business world. Sports teach young women and girls skills beyond teamwork and dedication. Learning to be aggressive, competitive and tough may make them the kind of employees eager to take on more responsibility and seek promotions.

It could also be that the same families that encourage girls to be athletes encourage women to be competitive and successful at work and at everything they do.

Whatever the reason, it is becoming more and more apparent that starting on the court or field may be the best path to the boardroom, especially for women.

Multisport PHOTO

A List of Athletes Turned Successful Entrepreneurs

In today’s sports-crazed world, athletes like Lebron James and Tony Hawk have quickly become household names. But it’s not just their sport that’s making them famous.

Athletes are becoming known for their entrepreneurship and savvy business deals—earning more off the playing field than on. From personalised apparel to multimillion dollar investment companies, see why these athletes truly “score” in the business world.

Please find a list of successful athletes turned entrepreneurs below:

  • Oscar De La Hoya
  • Michael Jordan
  • Venus Williams
  • Tony Hawk
  • John Elway
  • LeBron James
  • George Foreman
  • Dave Bing
  • Roger Staubach
  • Chris Webber
  • Wayne Gretzky
  • Magic Johnson

An athlete is a person who competes in one or more sports that involve physical strength, speed or endurance. The use of the term in sports such as golf or auto racing is somewhat controversial. Athletes may be professionals or amateurs.