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What will 2025 look like for the life sciences and healthcare sector?

As 2020 draws to a close, Deloitte has unveiled ten predictions on how patients, healthcare and life science companies and their staff might behave and operate in five years’ time, based on today’s evidence.

  • Advances in AI-enabled robotics, cognitive automation, digitalisation and life-long learning will help task shifting and role-enrichment, changing the who, what, and where of work.
  • Advanced AI-enabled technologies will also have accelerated drug discovery and clinical trials improving efficiency and efficacy and reducing costs, enabling companies to reverse the decline in the returns from pharma R&D.
  • Predictive prevention models will have led to more precise public health digital interventions – dramatically lowering smoking rates, improving nutrition and reducing loneliness.

Karen Taylor, director, UK Centre for Health Solutions, said: “This year, inevitably, our predictions have been informed by the unparalleled impact of COVID-19 and how people perceive health risks.

“In response to the pandemic, the pharma industry, academia, biotech and governments initiated scientific ventures funded by governments, multilateral agencies, not-for-profit institutions and the private sector. The sharing of data has expedited the search for new treatments and vaccines, with regulators quickly entering into discussion aimed at supporting the most promising innovations.”

Hanno Ronte, partner, Monitor Deloitte added: “Traditional boundaries are becoming more porous, creating an opportunity for new healthcare behaviours and business and funding models from both incumbents and new entrants.

“We have seen a new public appreciation of the contribution that healthcare and life sciences companies make to each countries’ response to the pandemic. There has also been a huge acceleration in the pace and scale of technology-enabled transformation in ways of working and engaging with patients across the whole health ecosystem that has stood out.”

Mathieu Colas and Hélène Chaplain join Monitor Deloitte France

Both new partners have been at Deloitte for between six months to one and a half years, and after demonstrating their track record externally and internally, they have been promoted to senior partner and admitted into Monitor Deloitte’s ranks. Monitor Deloitte is the strategy consulting brand of Deloitte Consulting, established in 2012 after Deloitte acquired Monitor Group, a boutique US-headquartered strategic consultancy that was founded by among others strategy guru Michael Porter.

Hélène Chaplain is a senior partner in the firm’s Digital Strategy & Innovation practice, and is the leader of Deloitte’s wider Consumer Business industry segment, which spans services to clients in the automotive, consumer goods, retail, transportation and hospitality industries. She previously spent 17 years at Accenture, since 2001 in the role of partner. In her most recent roles, Chaplain served as Accenture France’s industry lead for consumer goods and was head of the firm’s digital consulting arm for clients in the products landscape.

Mathieu Colas is a senior partner in charge of Monitor Deloitte’s automotive and new mobility offerings. He started his career with Deloitte at Deloitte Digital – the Big Four firm’s rapidly growing digital wing – and previously spent four years at Capgemini Invent and over a decade at Oliver Wyman. Colas focuses on topics including (digital) strategy, large-scale transformation, emerging technologies, advanced analytics and digital transformation.

As part of their new roles, both Colas and Chaplain joined Monitor Deloitte’s annual offsite in June. During the three day trip to Biarritz in the south of France, the firm’s leadership walked through the year’s top accomplishments and the ambitions for the current financial year. Meanwhile, consultants were provided the room to network, share experiences and best practices and enjoy the region’s sunny weather and culinary culture.

Last year, Monitor Deloitte France added Olivier Perrin, a former Accenture Strategy partner, to its leadership ranks in Paris.