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Pinsent Masons Law Firm Advises GNA Biosolutions GmbH

Pinsent Masons advised GNA Biosolutions GmbH on IP and commercial aspects of its rapid PCR COVID-19 test. The test, developed by German molecular diagnostics company GNA Biosolutions, has been approved by the domestic regulatory German Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices.

PCR means polymerase chain reaction. It’s a test to detect genetic material from a specific organism, such as a virus. The test detects the presence of a virus if you have the virus at the time of the test.

The new PCR test, which produces a result in 40 minutes, is being rolled out across Germany with EU-wide approval expected in the coming months

The reliability of the rapid test system by GNA Biosolutions is comparable to common PCR tests, which, however, require up to 48 hours for a result.

GNA Biosolutions is a molecular technology company based in Martinsried, Germany.

Their breakthrough technology, Pulse Controlled Amplification, transforms molecular testing by combining ultrafast nucleic acid amplification with intrinsic sample prep, to enable powerful solutions for the laboratory, on-site applications and the Point of Care.

Theirvision is to bring the power of molecular testing, from sample to answer, to everyone, everywhere.

The Pinsent Masons team advising on the deal was led by corporate partner Tobias Rodehau and included head of German public and regulatory Dr. Anke Empting, commercial and IP partner Dr. Michael Reich, technology, science and industry sector head Dr. Florian von Baum, head of German IP Marc Holtorf, and commercial legal director Dr. Igor Barabash.

GNA Biosolutions GmbH is a long-standing client of Pinsent Masons. In 2019 the firm successfully advised the company on its USD 13.5 million Series C financing.

The Bavarian state government has acquired six GNA Biosolutions test devices, which were officially approved in December, as well as 60,000 test kits.

DNA Testing of Children on The Death of A Father

Genetic testing, also known as DNA testing, is used to identify changes in DNA sequence or chromosome structure. Genetic testing can also include measuring the results of genetic changes, such as RNA analysis as an output of gene expression, or through biochemical analysis to measure specific protein output.

The decision of the High Court following the death of Colin Wilson Birtles highlights the importance of having a will. In this case, the first daughter obtained a Grant of Representation so that they could administer the estate of their father.

The second daughter applied to the court for an order to have the Grant set aside and sought a declaration that the first daughter was not Mr Birtles’ biological daughter.

The first daughter argued that her mother and Mr Birtles were married at the date she was born and that Mr Birtles was named on her birth certificate; therefore “there was a common law presumption that was the father, rebuttable on the balance of probabilities.”

The court decided in the circumstances of the case that the first daughter should be compelled to give a saliva sample for the purposes of a DNA test. If the first daughter refused, the court said that it would draw adverse inferences against her.

In this case both of the daughters were adults, but what if there was doubt as to paternity and one or more of the children had been a minor? As second families become more commonplace there is a likelihood of this happening more often. A minor child cannot consent to a DNA test and it can be imagined that a child’s mother may not wish to consent especially if there is a chance that the paternity of the child is in doubt.

If the person with parental responsibility of a minor child refuses to consent to their child having a DNA test then an order of the court may be sought allowing a sample to be taken “if the court considers that it would be in best interests”.

In the case of Mr Birtles, the court considered submissions on the human rights implications of ordering the test, particularly the right to respect for family and private life. The judge balanced this against the “public interest in the accurate resolution of inheritance disputes” and considered that ordering a DNA test would be proportionate in the circumstances.

The judge also considered the emotional toil that a negative DNA result might have but held that upset had already been caused by the dispute and the DNA testing would not compound this unnecessarily.

It cannot be known what Mr Birtles would have wanted in the case that one of his daughters had turned out not to be his biological child. It is very possible that he would have wanted both daughters to be treated equally; he had never challenged either daughter’s paternity.

All of the upset and costs involved in the sad case of Mr Birtles and his daughters can be avoided where a carefully prepared will is in place. Don’t leave it to chance; when emotions are high following a death; cracks can appear in even the most seemingly amicable family relationships.