Posts

Do You Make Videos? Here Are Some Useful Tips

Making videos for fun or work can be an extremely rewarding experience. There’s room for creative expression and playing with the medium, and a finished product that can be shared with people in your industry or friends and family and kept forever to be returned to for nostalgic purposes. This being said, when you put a lot of time and effort into a video, and things go wrong, it can be extremely frustrating. The following will explore a few useful tips that can help ensure that your video-making experience is a positive one.

Room Tone

Room tone is one of those things that you don’t realise can make your life endlessly easier unless you’ve used it before. Most filmmakers will tell you that a movie is made in the editing room, and that’s exactly where room tone comes in handy. Basically, it involves recording thirty seconds of audio in every location that you shoot in with no talking or sound effects like cars or birds going on. Having this audio clip makes editing infinitely easier as you can now cut an audio clip in the middle and spread it out to create a longer gap between one word and the next, filling in the space with room tone. Room tone is needed instead of silence because every location has ambient noise; the fridge and lights, and heating systems all contribute a soft hum into the air. Wind causes grass to rustle. Outdoor noises are filtered through windows into homes. Silence sounds awkward and strange when spliced between two audio clips because all locations have a texture to their sound.

Figure Out Your Export Settings

If you’re regularly creating videos, one of the best things you can do to ease the process is figuring out what export settings work for your purposes and saving these settings. This will allow for all your videos to have the same look and feel but also help your projects get more views on whichever platforms they’re on since they’re optimised for those platforms. You’ll want to read through a guide to video encoding as well as look up the recommended quality and size of videos on the sites and platforms you’re posting on. People tend to click away from videos that load too slowly or are oddly sized, and you don’t have unlimited space, so you don’t simply want the largest videos possible.

Have A Script

If time is of the essence, having a script makes things far easier. A script is like a checklist of everything you need to capture in order to edit your video. Yes, you can simply play around with your friends and film improvisation, but this will result in longer shooting times, a greater risk you will have missed a crucial point that’s needed for things to make sense, and longer editing times. While it can be fun to format your script as they do in Hollywood, know that you don’t need to do this or have any fancy software to have a script. Simply writing down what is to be said and what’s going on while it’s being said can be a big help.

Develop A Code For Children And Animals

One of the most brilliant film techniques for working with children and animals involves a predetermined code that all adults know. It can be hard to get kids and animals to perform on command, yet often, when they’re left to their own devices between takes, magic can happen. Establish a code word for the adults in your crew that means: everyone pretends nothing is happening but actually starts recording. This can be used to capture brilliant moments of genuine play and interest and can add a profound level of realism to your final product.

Have A Loud Sound At The Beginning

You’ve probably seen those big clapper tools that professional films use to mark the beginning of scenes. While the text on the clappers is helpful as it lets the editor know what scene and what take they’re looking at (this is vitally helpful if a director leaves a note like: I loved to take four on the medium shot), the main magic of this is the clapping sound that occurs. A quick loud noise results in a jump in the waveform of the audio file which can easily be seen while editing. If you’re synchronising multiple audio clips or audio and video clips, this makes things super easy; all you have to do is line up the blips in the waveform.

The above tips should help make some of the logistical elements of videography easier so you can focus on the creative and fun elements. Of course, every project is different, and it’s important to remember that artists are allowed to break the rules.

Advisory Excellence Website Traffic Update

Advisory Excellence saw its monthly website traffic grow, driven by a spike in readership levels. Website traffic refers to users who visit a website.

Web traffic is measured in visits, sometimes called “sessions,” and is a common way to measure a brands effectiveness at attracting an audience.

The pandemic boosted traffic towards digital news – and titles such as Advisory Excellence – have been no exception. Data shows that website traffic to the most widely read business titles also surged during the pandemic.

Advisory Excellence Instagram Traffic

Advisory Excellence Instagram Traffic

Mobile accounts for approximately half of web traffic worldwide. In the first quarter of 2021, mobile devices generated 54.8 percent of global website traffic, consistently hovering around the 50 percent mark since the beginning of 2017.

The percentage of global web traffic on mobile phones has surged over the past decade. As of November 2021, 53.98 percent of all web traffic came through mobile phones.

When COVID-19 struck, it forced societal changes around the globe. Business people turned to various collaboration platforms and video conferencing capacities to remain engaged with their colleagues, clients and students, while working from home offices.

Advisory Excellence Facebook Traffic

Advisory Excellence Facebook Traffic

This helped to drive a digital transformation that has impacted business people across many industries.

Advisory Excellence was at the forefront of this transformation and offers digital networking, as well news distribution to business people from around the globe.

Information and data privacy law heavyweight joins Pinsent Masons

Multinational law firm Pinsent Masons has hired partner Jonathan Kirsop as a key addition to its leading data privacy and information law offering.

Jonathan advises a wide range of clients on data privacy with particular focus on the financial services sector. His range of expertise spans contractual and regulatory advice, data subject access requests, international data transfers as well as providing broader technology, data and commercial expertise.

He joins the firm from Stephenson Harwood where he established and led the information law practice within their commercial, outsourcing and technology team.

Jonathan will assist in the further development of Pinsent Masons’ information and data privacy law capabilities in London, particularly to the firm’s financial services clients, as well as working with partners within the rest of the UK, across Europe and Asia Pacific offices.

Simon Colvin, Head of the Technology, Media and Telecommunications practice at Pinsent Masons said “Data and privacy is at the heart of the business for most of our clients. As the regulatory landscape continues to evolve, Jonathan brings valuable expertise to support clients, particularly in the heavily regulated financial services sector, as their needs for support and advice on all things information and data privacy law grow and become more complex.”

Laura Cameron, Head of Risk Advisory Services at Pinsent Masons said “The demand for data and privacy advice has increased exponentially and it has become a boardroom issue for businesses. Jonathan is a key addition to the firm at this time, as the continued development of technology and indeed the strategic use of, and protection of, data is a business critical issue for all organisations.”

Industry predictions: Technology, Media and Telecom sector trends

The technology, media and telecommunications (TMT) practice at Deloitte, the business advisory firm, has today announced its predictions for the UK TMT sector in 2019. The news comes following the launch of the eighteenth edition of Deloitte’s TMT Predictions 2019 report.

Deloitte’s TMT Predictions 2019 report – summary:

Smart speakers will be the fastest-growing connected device in 2019, with expected growth of 63% year-on-year to reach £5.6bn in revenue worldwide

Global 3D printing revenues from large public companies will rise by 12.6% to surpass £2bn, representing a significant but small proportion (0.02%) of all manufacturing revenues

c.20 handset vendors will launch 5G-ready devices in 2019, with 50,000 5G-enabled handsets to be shipped in the UK by the end of the year.

Smart Speakers: the hear and now

Deloitte predicts that smart speakers – internet-connected speakers with integrated digital assistants – will be the fastest-growing connected device in 2019, with 164 million units to be sold globally, up from 98 million in 2018. The smart speaker market is expected to grow by 63% year-on-year to £5.6bn in revenue, with a global installed base of a quarter of a billion by the end of 2019.

As of mid-2018, 12% of UK adults, approximately 6.2 million, had access to a smart speaker. This compares with 22% of adults in urban China and 19% in the USA. With 8% of global shipments reaching the UK, UK revenue for smart speakers will reach £44.8mn ($56.7mn) in 2019.

Paul Lee, global head of research for technology, media and telecoms at Deloitte, comments: “Smart speaker adoption has seen phenomenal growth in recent years. With improvements continuing to be made, demand for smart speakers could be in the many billions of units, possibly even higher than for smartphones. In the future, smart speakers have the potential to be installed in every room in a house, hotel, office, school and even beside every hospital bed.

“Significantly, smart speakers have, literally, a world of opportunity for growth in non-English-speaking countries. So far, the vast majority of these devices have been sold to markets with English as the primary language. As linguistic software improves, demand will continue to soar, particularly if these speakers appeal to customers speaking Chinese, French, Spanish, Italian, and Japanese.

“We expect smart speakers to be the seventh most-used consumer device this year, and it may take some years before this technology’s true impact is felt. Mass adoption has yet to happen, voice recognition accuracy has plenty of scope for improvement, and there are still relatively few apps available.”

Radio: Revenue, reach, and resilience

Radio, the 99-year old traditional medium, will maintain its hold on UK media consumption, with 47 million people listening to radio weekly or more often. Global radio revenues are forecast to increase modestly to £31.6 billion, still many multiples of emerging media formats such as eSports, whose revenues are likely to be 40 times smaller.

Globally, Deloitte predicts that nearly three billion people will listen to radio weekly in 2019, and that total radio revenue will reach £31.6bn ($40bn), a one per cent increase from 2018.

Lee comments: “Due to the rise of on-demand media and streaming services, many underestimate the influence radio still holds. The perception that video or indeed streaming has killed the radio star is simply not the case. Whether it’s in the car, over breakfast, or even at work, the vast majority of people in the UK still have at least one ear on the airwaves during the course of the day. Radio is alive, well and enjoyed by all ages.”

The UK is the fifth largest market globally for annual radio revenues, with revenues of £1.3bn ($1.6bn) in 2017. The US is by far the largest market (£17.2bn/$21.8bn) followed by Germany (£3.1bn/$3.9bn).

Lee adds: “Radio advertising is underestimated, with many unaware of the influence it holds for brands. As traditional media and television viewing figures continue to struggle, listening figures for radio are holding steady. Radio will continue to play an integral role in advertising campaigns for years to come. In a world where digital changes everything, radio may be the exception.”

3D printing: Growth accelerates again, but remains niche

Deloitte predicts that sales related to 3D printing by large public companies will surpass £2.1bn in 2019 and £2.4bn in 2020, growing by 12.5% year-on-year, more than double its growth rate compared to just a few years ago.

This growth will be driven by faster printing speeds, larger printing volume and, crucially, an increase in the number of materials able to be printed. Metal is expected to overtake plastics and represent more than half of all 3D printing within the next two years.

Lee comments: “In 2019, 3D printing will finally start to make its mark. Companies across multiple industries are using the technology for more than just rapid prototyping. 3D printers today are capable of printing a greater variety of materials, which mainly means more metal printing and less plastic printing. Plastic is fine for prototypes and certain final parts, but the trillion-dollar metal-parts fabrication market is the more important market for 3D printers to address.

“Bionic prosthetic limbs for children for instance, which are usually costly, particularly due to the need to replace these frequently as children grows, have been revolutionised by the introduction of 3D printing and can now be produced for a mere £20.”

5G enters the mainstream in 2019

2019 will also see the first mass-market generation of 5G-enabled handsets go on sale. Deloitte predicts that around 20 handset vendors will launch 5G-ready handsets in 2019, with the first available in Q2. Approximately one million 5G-enabled handsets will be shipped by the year’s end, out of a projected 1.5 billion smartphone handsets which will be sold in total in 2019. In the UK, 5G shipments will number around 50,000.

Julian Rae, Technology partner at Deloitte in Cambridge, concludes: “The introduction of 5G handsets expected this year will look a lot like 2010, when 4G phones first entered the market. There will be a lot of noise in the first year from vendors vying to be first to market, and relatively little action from consumers. We’re not talking about an overnight switch to faster connectivity with lower latency, we will see 5G used by consumers in hotspot locations in the next two to three years, with mass adoption by 2025.”

To hear about the above TMT Predictions and more, Julian Rae and Paul Lee will be hosting the Deloitte Telecoms, Media & Technology Predictions Breakfast Event in Cambridge on 13 February at 1 Station Square, Cambridge, CB1 2GA. For more information please contact [email protected].