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9/11 Victim Compensation Fund: What Is It And Who Is Covered?

The September 11 attacks, commonly referred to as 9/11, were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks. Typically, crimes are considered unlawful behaviours that can affect the general public. If you get hurt as a result of these criminal acts, you’ll need to deal with some serious consequences, including disability, payment of medical bills, lost wages, pain and suffering, and other similar conditions.

To help recover from these losses, the government has established the Victim Compensation Funds (VCF). Although these crime compensation programs differ from state to state, the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund is the most common.

COMPENSATION CLAIM red Rubber Stamp over a white background.

Read on to learn everything about the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund, including its coverage.

What Is The 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund?

The September 11 terrorist attack has left fear, trauma, and emotional anguish for all the victims, survivors, and their families. Many people died and were injured during the attack, making it one of the most catastrophic events in the history of the United States.

This is how the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund began. It’s a government-mandated program designed to compensate individuals or their representatives who suffered death or physical harm because of the terrorist attack on September 11, 2001, and its aftermath.

Originally, the 9/11 VCF operated from 2001 to 2004. But, in January 2011, President Obama signed into law a bill reactivating the September 11 Victim Compensation Fund, which allows affected individuals to file their claims until October 2016.

In December 2015, President Obama reauthorized the VCF, extending it for five years. This means that all eligible people can submit their claims until December 2020.

But, in July 2019, President Trump signed into law the permanent authorisation of VCF, extending the submission of claims from December 2020 to October 2090.

Who Is Covered By The 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund?

Before filing a 9/11 VCF claim, it’s crucial to establish your eligibility to do so. This means you should be qualified to bring a claim to recover compensation under the criteria provided by the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund Program.

The following are the individuals who are eligible for an award under VCF:

  • Those who were diagnosed with 9/11 illnesses, including acute traumatic injury, VCF-recognised cancers, aerodigestive disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, mental health conditions, and other diseases proven to be caused by 9/11 fumes and toxic dust.
  • Those who were volunteers, first responders, and other individuals who worked, lived, or went to school near ground zero of the attack and the exposure zone from September 11, 2001, to May 30, 2002.

The exposure zone includes the area of Lower Manhattan south of Canal Street, Clinton Street, and East Broadway Street, plus the debris removal routes and the locations where the equipment and trucks are serviced.

However, it’s essential to know that proving you’re a victim of the 9/11 terrorist attack can be complicated. You need to procure enough evidence to ensure you satisfy the criteria mentioned above. Hence, to help you with the claims process, you can check some reputable legal websites and other online resources to learn more information.

What Is The 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund’s Coverage?

Primarily, the VCF’s goal is to compensate victims and their families for all the losses they sustained due to the attack. It’s also created to ensure that they wouldn’t file claims against the airlines involved in the September 11 terrorist attack.

Additionally, the compensation covers medical costs, including hospitalisation, mental health counselling, and other related expenses. However, a standard calculation based on the following factors is used to determine the proper compensation for each eligible individual:

  • Collateral offsets: These refer to benefits obtained by a person from many sources. These can include disability insurance proceeds, which are usually deducted from life insurance proceeds in the event of death.
  • Economic losses: These refer to losses incurred as a result of the disability caused by the crime.
  • Non-economic losses: These cover all the diseases and death caused by the criminal event.

To get the right compensation amount, the economic and non-economic losses are added, and the sum is subtracted from the collateral assets. Although the formula seems straightforward, the computation can be a bit tricky.

Because of this, it’s best to seek legal assistance from a dedicated attorney to guide you through the process. Their knowledge and experience on this matter can help you receive the right compensation for your losses, which is essential in getting back on your feet in no time.

Bottom Line

Being injured due to a violent crime can be a frustrating ordeal. To help you rebuild your life and that of your family, you may be qualified to file a 9/11 VCF claim to get paid financially for all your losses.

So, keep the information mentioned above in mind to educate yourself about this compensation program. Knowing how the September 11 Victim Compensation Fund works can help you handle your claim more efficiently to achieve a positive outcome.

6 Things You Should Know About Certificates of Insurance

Certificates of insurance! In every business, there is paperwork. Whether you are self-employed, run a small business, or work as a contractor, you’ll probably be stacking up all kinds of paperwork. From tax returns to invoices, there are loads of paper trails to keep track of.

One of these types of paperwork you’ll likely already have – and should have if you don’t already – is a certificate of insurance. In this article, you will learn everything you need to know about certificates of insurance, what they are, and why they are so essential. So, if you’re any kind of business owner, read on for the 6 things you should know about certificates of insurance.

What is a Certificate of Insurance?

Let’s start with the basics; what is a certificate of insurance? Quite simply, as explained by the insurance specialists over at https://www.icnj.com/blog/what-is-a-certificate-of-insurance/, COI is essentially a form your insurance agent or company provides you to verify you have insurance. That’s it! A certificate to show you have insurance.

These documents do not alter or change your policy, instead, they simply prove that you have a policy. Sounds simple right? Well, that’s because it is! By the time you are looking at a certificate of insurance, it means the hard work is already done and you are adequately insured. Let’s dig a little deeper into a COI, what it should include, and why they are important.

What Should it Include?

A certificate of insurance is not an in-depth look at your insurance policy – you will find these details in your policy schedule or other paperwork provided by your insurer. However, they do include a few key points that you need to make sure are on there.

Firstly, it should include the name and contact details of your insurance provider. Then, it should have a brief overview or title of your policy, along with the dates that your insurance is valid to/from. On top of that, your coverage amounts and company details should be included. Other than that, no other details are required on a COI.

How to Get One

Many policy providers will include a certificate of insurance. However, if they don’t, you can simply request one directly from your insurer. They will deal with you directly and either digitally or physically send you a certificate. Once you have one, you can display it, duplicate it, or store it somewhere safe.

They Should Usually Be Free

Luckily, most insurers provide policy certificates free of charge. These documents are easy to produce and verify, so there should be no extra charge for doing so. They will have a simple template that they can modify to include your policy information. If your insurer does charge you for a certificate of insurance, the fee should be very minimal. It is unusual for an insurer to charge more than a few dollars for such a document.

Who Will Need to See Yours?

So, why might you need a COI? Depending on your type of work, it may be necessary to produce many copies of a COI for various people. For example, if you are a freelance contractor or any other freelance specialist, the person hiring you needs to know that you are insured before they let you work on their site. If you are uninsured, you risk causing them issues, both legally and financially.

On the other hand, you might need to see other company’s certificates of insurance. If you use vendors, suppliers, or have tenants in commercial properties, you need to ensure that they are adequately insured. If you don’t, any faults may fall at your lap and cost you dearly.

How Long Should You Keep COIs?

Finally, what should you do with your certificates and how long for? Ideally, you should keep them in a safe place – either digitally or physically – forever. Many insurance claims are taken retrospectively, meaning that someone may come chasing you for a certificate of insurance from many, many years ago. You may have changed policy or provider during this time, but so long as you have proof of your original insurance, you’ll be able to use that policy. Therefore, it’s vital to make sure you have copies of all your insurance policies and their certificates from your time in business.

These 6 things are the crucial pieces of information you need to know about certificates of insurance. If any of these things apply to you, then make sure you’re getting hold of a copy of your COI and putting it in a safe place. You never know when you might need it.