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EY Croatia acquires the tech company ENTG

Consulting company EY Croatia acquired the creative tech company ENTG, the Croatian website Netokracija reported. With this acquisition, EY Croatia makes a great entrance to the digital and the disruptive industry.

For ENTG, on the other hand, this exit is a step forward in their evolution that will improve their position on the market. Reportedly, it is yet to be decided whether they will keep their brand as ENTG, or will operate under the EY brand.

“In order to evolve, we decided to continuously disrupt ourselves. That’s why we are happy to announce joining our forces to EY family. Big thanks to everyone who had our back and who trusted us to keep theirs also! We are bringing all the legacy we’ve made so far into a new and upgraded era for all existing and new clients, partners and colleagues but now powered by an amazing EY Croatia!”, wrote the ENTG team on their Facebook page.

According to ENTG CEO, Ida Pandur, her team within EY will be dedicated to providing advisory services in the field of Customer Experience (CX). Moreover, they will give EY a new mindset and new energy in digitization and marketing.

“My team will be in charge of consulting services in the CX area, especially in the digital area. All that we have built up as ENTG to date; we will continue to do within the EY but at a higher level. EY will take over the entire business, including the team and the cooperation with our clients and partners”, says Pandur for Netokracija.

For EY Croatia this conquest means a further expansion that will give an added value to their current and their future customers – services that go beyond traditional finance ones such as audit, accounting and tax advisory and consulting.

“I believe that the combination of the specific digital skills that the ENTG team has; together with the innovative and traditional financial knowledge, the strength of the EY’s global network of professionals and the great domestic market experience, will add value to our clients. I hope that this new practice will be recognized in our country”, says Horvat Berislav, Country Managing Partner at EY Croatia, Netokracija reported.

Under the corporate motto “Inspired by digital”, ENTG was found in 2013 by the 26th old Ida Pandur. ENTG is a creative tech company and consulting hub for advanced digital strategies and projects. The company goal is to provide clients with unique 360 approaches in creating their strategies and make digital fully integrated part of complete marketing and business development activities plan.

EY on the other side is multinational professional services firm with a special focus in the finance industry. Globally, EY is known as one of the “Big Four” accounting companies. The company operates as a network of member firms which are separate legal entities in individual countries. In Croatia, EY is present since 1991, providing audit, advisory, accounting, tax and transaction support services.

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MicroStrategy® Wins a 2018 Industry Excellence Award

MicroStrategy® Incorporated (Nasdaq: MSTR), a leading worldwide provider of enterprise analytics and mobility software, today announced that Dresner Advisory Services has honored MicroStrategy with a 2018 Technology Leader for Business Intelligence award for its strong position in the 2018 Wisdom of Crowds® Business Intelligence (BI) report.

The Dresner Advisory Services Industry Excellence Awards go to brands that were ranked as leaders in two user-rating models included in the Wisdom of Crowds series of global Dresner research reports. The reports are based on data collected from a large base of end users in the BI and analytics industry and provide a broad and detailed assessment of each market, including current product usage, key buying drivers, technology priorities, and future intentions, as well as performance ratings of all relevant vendors.

“We congratulate MicroStrategy for receiving top marks from its customer base,” said Howard Dresner, founder and chief research officer at Dresner Advisory Services. “The unique value of our research is in its end user perspective of the market, both in adoption trends and intentions, and the ability to provide an unfiltered assessment of industry suppliers.”

The MicroStrategy platform provides the capabilities organizations need to build and deploy modern analytics and mobility applications that transform and accelerate business decisions. By putting answers in everyone’s hands, regardless of enterprise role, function, or skill level, the MicroStrategy platform helps organizations become a more Intelligent Enterprise™.

“The recognition from industry leader Dresner Advisory Services marks another milestone in our mission of making every enterprise a more Intelligent Enterprise,” said Michael J. Saylor, CEO, MicroStrategy Incorporated. “With our award-winning enterprise analytics and mobility platform, organizations around the world can get the answers they need, delivered where they need them, to make effective decisions for competitive advantage, driving their digital transformation initiatives and planning today for tomorrow’s challenges.”

This award is the latest in a line of increasing industry recognition for MicroStrategy, which was top ranked in the 2018 Wisdom of Crowds Location Intelligence Market Study and received a Dresner Advisory Services 2017 Technology Innovation Award for embedded BI and big data analytics. Start a free trial of MicroStrategy Desktop™ today.

About Dresner Advisory Services

Dresner Advisory Services was formed by Howard Dresner, an independent analyst, author, lecturer, and business adviser. Dresner Advisory Services, LLC focuses on creating and sharing thought leadership for Business Intelligence (BI), information management, performance management and related areas.

About MicroStrategy Incorporated

MicroStrategy (Nasdaq: MSTR) is a worldwide leader in enterprise analytics and mobility software. A pioneer in the BI and analytics space, MicroStrategy delivers innovative software that empowers people to make better decisions and transform the way they do business. We provide our enterprise customers with world-class software and expert services so they can deploy unique intelligence applications. To learn more, visit MicroStrategy online, and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

MicroStrategy, MicroStrategy Desktop, and Intelligent Enterprise are either trademarks or registered trademarks of MicroStrategy Incorporated in the United States and certain other countries. Other product and company names mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

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Facebook to add 1,000 jobs in Ireland in 2019

Facebook is to hire an additional 1,000 people in Ireland over the course of 2019.

The extra roles will be created across 60 teams, including the social media giants’ engineering, safety, legal, policy, marketing and sales teams.

The roles will based on its Ballsbridge campus which was previously home to AIB.

The expansion will bring the total number of people employed across its centres in Cork, Dublin and Meath to 5,000.

The announcement was made in Dublin today by the company’s chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg, while she attended Facebook’s Gather event in Croke Park.

More than 500 small and medium businesses from Ireland and across the EMEA region attended the event.

Speaking on one of Facebook’s priorities in 2019 to earn users’ trust, Ms Sandberg said: “Facebook is a very different company to what it was in 2016 or even a year ago”.

She detailed the steps the company has taken, and will be taking, in key priority areas including “the safety and security of Facebook’s users; the commitment to cracking down on fake accounts and false news; strengthening defences against election interference; and being even more transparent in how it operates and makes decisions, to make itself more publicly accountable”.

Meanwhile, Head of Facebook Ireland, Gareth Lambe, admitted today that the company is concerned about the current housing crisis gripping the country.

However, he says it is not something which has stunted Facebook’s growth, and insists he has faith in how the government is tackling the problem.

“We’re concerned, of course; to date, it hasn’t been a blocker for us hiring, we have over 4,000 people here in Ireland and announcing another 1,000 today is a big investment,” he said.

POP OUT We support all the government’s initiatives, we think they’re doing all the right things around planning, reform and cost benchmarking and all the infrastructure reform that we’re doing.

“We think that will release this glut in a few years, we see it being not as bad in a few years,” he said.

It was also announced today that Facebook would triple its investment in online safety programmes run by the National Anti-Bullying Centre (ABC) and SpunOut.ie, bringing the total investment to €1m.

The funding will go towards research and an online training program for teachers and parents of secondary school students.

An online safety resource for teenagers will also be created in partnership with SpunOut.ie.

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Businesses struggling with GDPR compliance

According to a recent survey conducted by Deloitte, only 30% of organisations are have been responding to customer requests regarding their personal data within the GDPR timeframe.

What is GDPR?

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into effect in May of this year. A measure put in place to modernise previous data protection directives from the 1990s, GDPR aims to keep pace with rapid technological changes when it comes to protecting customer information. Furthermore, GDPR was implemented to set in a place a more consistent set of guidelines across Europe.

Although GDPR regulations have been more effectively applied to technological advancements, it took more than four years of negotiation and discussion before GDPR guidelines were decided upon. This highlights how, even though steps have been taken, uptake is still too slow when compared to the innovation of the technology sector, and the potential misuse and monopolisation of data.

Each European country had the option to alter the laws slightly according to their own jurisdictions. In the UK, the Data Protection Act 2018 was initially greeted with some controversy since guidelines were amended in this country to protect cyber-security researchers.

These guidelines protect the consumer by allowing them easier access to what data a company has access to, as well as introducing steeper fines to organisations who go against regulations. This is overseen and implemented by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). Companies must inform the ICO no later than 72 hours after any form of breach occurs where data they have stored has been accessed.

Businesses were allowed from May 2016 to May 2018 to prepare for and implement new GDPR measures, and so the question remains: why are businesses not fully adhering to the GDPR timeframe?

Is it the Brexit effect?

Post-Brexit changes should not have an overwhelming effect on GDPR guidelines, this is largely due to the contingencies each individual European country has been allowed to make so the laws most effectively work.

The two prior years businesses have had to fully prepare for GDPR have meant that businesses had the time to source other effective ways in which to gather the relevant information they need to conduct business, without breaching a customer’s right to privacy.

An example of a data breach story that made the headlines would be Facebook’s admission that 50 million ‘access tokens’ for accounts had been taken by unknown hackers. This is the kind of eventuality that GDPR regulations hopes to reduce through the introduction of stricter measures and hefty fines.

Survey conducted by Deloitte

“Six months in, what is clear is that some organisations are still grappling with the implementation of their GDPR compliance,” said Peter Gooch, cyber risk partner at Deloitte.

Deloitte has stated that in the six months GDPR has been in effect, more than two-thirds of organisations who took part in their global survey (consisting of answers supplied by 1,100 organisations) have been responding to customer data requests late.

Gooch continued: “Given the complexities of such programmes and increased consumer awareness of such requests, we would expect some bedding-in time. However, our research found that a fifth of organisations only aimed for bare minimum compliance back in May, which may be indicative of the delays some customers are currently experiencing.”

The GDPR timeframe for handling data requests submitted by the consumer (for example, the option to opt out of direct marketing or to erase their details from company systems) is one month. Although statistics for the fulfilment of this are low, it is an improvement on previous measures.

“That said, 33% of organisations surveyed continue to invest in their privacy practices, including in technology and talent,” said Gooch. “Since May, 70% of organisations surveyed have seen an increase in staff who are either partly or fully focused on GDPR compliance. For many, this included the recruitment of a dedicated Data Protection Officer (DPO). Of the countries surveyed, the UK leads in this respect, with 92% of respondents assigning a DPO.”

With DPO’s now being assigned role-specific responsibilities to handle GDPR guidelines, the number of businesses who are handling data requests in a timely manner should increase.

Gooch concluded: “Overall, organisations are taking the right steps in continuing their GDPR implementation and the majority (92%) felt confident in demonstrating their ability to conform in the long-term. In the immediate term, though, many will need to address today’s pressure to respond to data requests. This is particularly the case as online tools, enabling consumers to make mass data requests, increase in popularity.

“Those that are currently responding with some delay will need to take a more customer-centric approach, not only to meet the existing volume, but also the influx of requests their tools could create.”

If you would like to view our Privacy Policy, please click on the following link: https://www.advisoryexcellence.com/gdpr-privacy-policy/

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Exclusive: A lawyer’s guide to keeping it professional on social media

In today’s environment, social media allows people to instantly share their opinions with the world. However, given the many heated issues that dominate our national discourse, there can be a tendency to post (or tweet) in anger or passion, which can lead to regrets later.

This risk is especially dangerous for attorneys. While attorneys may sometimes view their presence on social media to be in a “personal” capacity, the reality is that the line between personal and business can be blurred, or may not exist at all. In particular, with respect to an attorney’s ethical obligations, it may not be a very effective defence for an attorney to claim that she was acting in her personal capacity, and not as a lawyer, when she violated an ethical rule.

Recognising the rise of these issues in the age of social media, the State Bar of California issued a Formal Opinion in 2012 that addressed the interplay between postings on a supposedly personal social media page and the ethical rules governing attorney advertising. State Bar of California Formal Op. No. 2012-186. At issue were certain posts on an attorney’s personal social media page that highlighted the successes the attorney had on other cases, such as “Another great victory in court today! My client is delighted. Who wants to be next?” The California Bar concluded that, even among posts relating to the attorney’s personal life, such posts and others constituted the solicitation of clients or otherwise “concern[ed] the availability for professional employment,” and thus were required to comply with the rules for attorney advertising set forth in the California Rules of Professional Conduct.

Another potential issue exacerbated by the rise of social media is the potential for “positional” conflicts. Such a conflict may typically exist where, for example, an attorney argues for a certain interpretation of a statute in one lawsuit because it is in the best interests of one client, but then at the same time argues for the opposite interpretation of the same statute in another lawsuit on behalf of a different client. Comment 6 to Rule 1.7 of the California Rules of Professional Conduct (as effective Nov. 1, 2018) provides that such circumstances typically do not create a conflict requiring the client’s informed written consent unless certain factors are present.

However, it is arguably less clear how positional conflicts may function in the context of positions taken on social media. Comment 4 to Rule 1.7 provides that a conflict of interest requiring informed written consent) exists “if there is a significant risk that a lawyer’s ability to consider, recommend or carry out an appropriate course of action for the client will be materially limited as a result of the lawyer’s other responsibilities, interests, or relationships, whether legal, business, financial, professional, or personal.” Interpreting similar provisions, at least one bar association has stated that attorneys sharing information on social media sites should exercise caution “when stating positions on issues, as those stated positions could be adverse to an interest of a client, thus inadvertently creating a conflict.” See District of Columbia Bar Ethics Op. 370.

Although some commentators have suggested that the D.C. Bar’s opinion goes too far to limit attorneys, social media posts can also create sticky client relations issues even if the posts do not rise to the level of a traditional conflict of interest. Below are some tips for avoiding issues when using social media.

Considering Staying Neutral

Social media is generally not a place for balanced, well-reasoned assessments of issues but is used by many to express visceral reactions to news events. While attorneys may feel the urge to immediately share their thoughts with the world, they do so at their own risk.

For example, if Congress is considering passing a law that may impact a client, an attorney may be inclined to immediately offer her or his opinion on that law without regard to whether that position is aligned with the client’s. Even if the attorney’s posting does not create an actual conflict, a client certainly may be less than pleased to see its law firm advocating for a position if that position stands to harm the client’s business, financial or legal interests.

Likewise, commenting on ongoing cases can also be risky, but attorneys who feel compelled to do so can limit their risks by avoiding taking a definite stance and instead presenting a balanced analysis. That could help avoid creating any potential positional conflict with the interests of a client of the attorney and her or his law firm.

Avoid Unprofessional Conduct

Attorneys (typically) understand that their correspondence and briefs should be consistent with the level of decorum expected of members of the bar. Too often, that level of decorum is thrown out the window on social media. However, despite the informality of social media, it should not be considered as a free zone for unprofessional conduct.

A good rule of thumb is to ask whether the comment made on social media would be appropriate if standing outside a courtroom or at a dinner party. Many times, attorneys post comments on social media that they would never say in a face-to-face conversation, much less one with a client.

In some respects, comments on social media are worse than face-to-face conversations, as they are generally broadcast to the world and preserved for posterity. Courts and bars are increasingly taking notice of these issues and applying the same bar rules to social media as they do to traditional legal correspondence.

Think First

The most obvious tip can often be the hardest in practice. Before posting on any substantive issue (e.g., legal or political issues), it is helpful to stop and think practically about the post and the possible response from their firms, clients, and potential clients. Where practical, it may be a good idea to first run the posting by a colleague or firm leadership to ensure that it does not create any unintended conflicts or client relations issues.

Too often, attorneys instead let their emotions take over and fire off a post without a second thought. While attorneys certainly can use social media effectively in establishing a presence in their community or in a certain practice area, the undisciplined use of social media can unfortunately create the wrong kind of presence very quickly.

Shari L. Klevens is a partner at Dentons US and serves on the firm’s US Board of Directors. She represents and advises lawyers and insurers on complex claims, is co-chair of Dentons’ global insurance sector team, and is co-author of “California Legal Malpractice Law” (2014).

Alanna Clair is a partner at Dentons US and focuses on professional liability defence. Shari and Alanna are co-authors of “The Lawyer’s Handbook: Ethics Compliance and Claim Avoidance.”

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20 great career tips from successful entrepreneurs

Being an entrepreneur is about the journey, not the destination. For those who have an entrepreneurial spirit, the following career tips are a reminder that it’s okay to fail—it’s all about learning from your mistakes and moving forward. Here are 20 great tips from successful entrepreneurs.

1. Elon Musk – Co-Founder of PayPal, CEO of Tesla & Founder of SpaceX

Elon Musk is a South African-born American entrepreneur, inventor, and investor. He is best known as CEO of electric-car manufacturer Tesla, co-founder of PayPal, and founder of commercial space program SpaceX. For an article in Time magazine, Musk was asked whether he had ever doubted his chances of success:

“I always knew that there was a chance of failure in all my endeavors,” he said. “But I felt that they were important enough that I had to try, even if I thought the probability of success was less than 50%.”

2. J.K. Rowling – Author of the Harry Potter Series

Known for her bestselling Harry Potter novels that have sold 450 million copies and won numerous awards, J.K. Rowling has a net worth of about US$850 million. Rowling has risen from rags to riches, and as she discussed in her 2008 commencement speech at Harvard University, knows that failure is not a bad thing:

“So why do I talk about the benefits of failure? Simply because failure meant a stripping away of the inessential. I stopped pretending to myself that I was anything other than what I was, and began to direct all my energy into finishing the only work that mattered to me. Had I really succeeded at anything else, I might never have found the determination to succeed in the one arena I believed I truly belonged.”

3. Stewart Butterfield – Co-Founder of Flickr & Slack

Canadian Stewart Butterfield is an entrepreneur and businessman, best known for being a co-founder of the photo sharing website Flickr and team messaging application Slack.

He recently shared some advice for young people with Adam Bryant of the New York Times: “Some people will know exactly what they want to do at a very young age, but the odds are low. I feel like people in their early- to mid-20s are very earnest. They’re very serious, and they want to feel like they’ve accomplished a lot at a very young age rather than just trying to figure stuff out. So I try to push them toward a more experimental attitude.”

4. Mark Cuban – Shark Tank Investor & Owner of the Dallas Mavericks

Known for his appearances on the ABC show Shark Tank, Cuban made his fortune through the sale of startups MicroSolutions and Broadcast.com in the 1990s, and later became known as the enthusiastic owner of the NBA’s Dallas Mavericks.

Cuban has made some controversial statements, but he does also give some pretty good advice. “One thing we can all control is effort. Put in the time to become an expert in whatever you’re doing. It will give you an advantage because most people don’t do this.”

5. Sheryl Sandberg – COO of Facebook

As the COO of Facebook, Sheryl Sandberg juggles the tasks of monetizing the world’s largest social networking site while keeping its users happy and engaged. It’s a huge responsibility, but one well suited to Sandberg, who earlier in her career developed Google’s successful online advertising programs, but also worked as an economist at the World Bank and as chief of staff to then-U.S. treasury secretary Larry Summers.

Here’s her take on how to be yourself at work, no matter what. “I don’t believe we have a professional self from Mondays through Fridays and a real self for the rest of the time. That kind of division probably never worked, but in today’s world … it makes even less sense. I’ve cried at work … I talk about my hopes and fears and ask people about theirs. I try to be myself. Honest about my strengths and weaknesses and I encourage others to do the same.”

6. Bill Gates – Founder of Microsoft

Bill Gates is an American business leader, entrepreneur, and philanthropist, best known as the co-founder of Microsoft. Famous for being one of the richest people in the world, Bill Gates tweeted the following career advice to new college graduates: “AI, energy, and biosciences are promising fields where you can make a huge impact. It’s what I would do if starting out today.” He also encouraged grads to “surround yourself with people who challenge you, teach you, and push you to be your best self.”

7. Simon Sinek – Leadership Expert & Author

Simon Sinek describes himself as someone who tries to “find, celebrate, and teach leaders how to build platforms that will inspire others.” He is a trained ethnographer and the author of the book Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action. In 2012, Sinek tweeted the following advice: “Dream big. Start small. But most of all, start.”

8. Steve Jobs – Co-Founder of Apple

As the co-founder and former CEO of Apple Inc., Steve Jobs was known for his relentless pursuit of excellence in everything the company did. At the root of his exacting standards was a deep passion for his work. In his commencement address at Stanford University in 2005, Jobs said: “Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it.”

9. Jeff Bezos – Founder & CEO of Amazon.Com

Jeff Bezos, the founder and CEO of online retailer Amazon.com and founder of space company Blue Origin, is currently the world’s richest person, with a total net worth of $134 billion as of May 2018. At a forum on leadership in April 2018, Bezos explained that space travel is his calling, and offered this advice: “You can have a job, or you can have a career, or you can have a calling. And if you can somehow figure out how to have a calling, you have hit the jackpot, ’cause that’s the big deal.”

10. Mark Zuckerberg – Co-Founder & CEO of Facebook

Mark Zuckerberg is the co-founder and CEO of Facebook and one of the richest people in the world. Back in 2011, he offered this advice to entrepreneurs during an interview at Y Combinator’s Start-up School in Palo Alto, California: “The biggest risk is not taking any risk. In a world that’s changing really quickly, the only strategy that is guaranteed to fail is not taking risks.”

11. Tobias Lütke – Founder & CEO of Shopify

Tobias Lütke is the founder and CEO of Shopify, a Canadian e-commerce company that went public in 2015. In an interview with Canadian Business, he said: “I really encourage people to find a place that sort of culturally aligns with what they’re trying to accomplish, and then just go for it.”

12. Marla Malcolm Beck – Co-Founder & CEO of Bluemercury

Marla Malcolm Beck is the co-founder and CEO of Bluemercury, a luxury beauty retailer and spa that was sold to Macy’s for $210 million in 2015. In an interview with Adam Bryant of the New York Times, Beck offered the following advice to graduating college students: “Bring an expertise or skill set into an organization, or be the expert at something that nobody else is doing.”

13. Chip Wilson – Founder & Former CEO of Lululemon Athletica

Chip Wilson, the founder and former CEO of athletic apparel company Lululemon Athletica, now manages a portfolio of companies under the name Hold It All. Back in 2013, Wilson shared the best advice he had ever received with Business Insider: “It took me a long time to understand it, but [the advice was] to ask for help and that I don’t know it all. People love to help. I don’t have to be insecure and know it all.”

14. Brian Chesky – Co-Founder & CEO of Airbnb

Brian Chesky, the co-founder and CEO of peer-to-peer apartment rental service Airbnb, told the New York Times’ Adam Bryant that recent grads shouldn’t listen to their parents.

“They’re the most important relationships in your life, but you should never take your parents’ career advice, and I’m using parents as a proxy for all the pressures in the world,” Chesky said. “I also say that whatever career you’re in, assume it’s going to be a massive failure. That way, you’re not making decisions based on success, money and career. You’re only making it based on doing what you love.”

15. Tony Robbins – Inspirational Speaker

Tony Robbins is a life and business strategist, bestselling author, and philanthropist. In a 2016 Facebook Live discussion hosted by Business Insider, Robbins shared the advice given to him early in his career by his mentor, the late motivational speaker Jim Rohn:

“Your worth in the marketplace is based on your ability to add more value than anyone else. If you can find a way to do more for others in your company, more for the employees, more for the clients, than anybody else, your gifts will make room for you. But in order to do that, you’ve got to build skills.”

16. Maya Angelou – Author & Activist

The many inspiring quotes from the late Maya Angelou are evidence of the celebrated writer and civil rights activist’s entrepreneurial spirit. Take this piece of advice, for example: “You can only become truly accomplished at something you love. Don’t make money your goal. Instead pursue the things you love doing and then do them so well that people can’t take their eyes off of you.”

17. Melanie Whelan – CEO of SoulCycle

Melanie Whelan, the CEO of fitness chain SoulCycle, believes that new college graduates should focus on the present and not get hung up on what they feel they “should” be doing. In an interview with the New York Times’ Adam Bryant, she said: “The first thing I say is to get a job and work hard. You are going to learn a ton in whatever that job is, so don’t stress too much about what it is or where it is. Just take a job and put your head down, work hard, raise your hand for anything anybody asks you to do.”

18. Rick Goings – CEO of Tupperware Brands

Rick Goings, the CEO of Tupperware Brands, began his career as a door-to-door salesman of encyclopedias—a job at which he was not successful. In an interview with Business Insider in 2015, Goings explained why failure is an important step on the road to success: “The experiences you get in failure are some of the best lessons you can apply in life. I truly believe you need to fail in order to succeed. It’s never a straight line to success, and it’s the bumps and pivots that help you get there.”

19. Salli Setta – President of Red Lobster

Salli Setta, the president of popular restaurant chain Red Lobster, told Business Insider that she sees lunchtime as a prime networking opportunity.

“It isn’t about saying ‘hi, what are we going to talk about, let’s talk about sports.’ It’s about identifying the object of this lunch in your mind.” Setta recommends preparing questions and ideas ahead of time for a more productive discussion.

20. Henry Ford – Founder of Ford Motor Company

Henry Ford, the founder of Ford Motor Company and the man who revolutionized the automobile industry by developing assembly line production, reportedly once said, “You can’t build a reputation on what you are going to do”—a helpful reminder for those who have entrepreneurial aspirations but have yet to take action!