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How to Get Started With Jewellery Making In The 21st Century

Having a hobby is vital for our wellbeing. Many of us work and are constantly burdened by the many responsibilities of life. This is why you must find the right activity to do outside of your chores and routine that you thoroughly enjoy. Although people take up hobbies solely for fun, it is possible for some of them to build and start to make a profit and be an additional source of income.

The difficulties faced in the last year due to the global pandemic, has seen a surge in unemployment as well as people being stuck at home with nothing to do. This has led many individuals to try new activities, and even try to make money from home. Jewellery making is a good example of a hobby many people choose and may result in being a way to make extra cash, whether you are unemployed or do this as a side hustle. You may think that making jewellery is difficult but everyone can do this. This article will explore how to get started with jewellery making in the 21st century.

Decide What Type of Jewellery Interests You

Making jewellery can be great fun, however, when you first start, it can also be somewhat overwhelming due to the wide range of choices you have. It would be unrealistic to focus on everything at the same time, particularly as a beginner, as you do not necessarily know what you are doing. Research a few different types of jewellery and pick one that seems easiest to get you started. Choosing something that is overly difficult may stop your motivation to continue with the hobby.

Improve a Few Essential Skills

When you start making your own jewellery, you may realise that there are a few important skills that you should master before you want to master this. You should not expect to be the best jewellery maker from day one and remember that practice makes perfect. The more you continue practicing and trying, the better you will become eventually. It may be a good idea to take a few classes so learn these skills and improve your overall technique rather than trying to do it alone. You may look for classes in your local area as surely there will be something available. On the other hand, you can research videos and expert blogs on the internet.

Invest in Quality Tools

Once you get started in jewellery making, you may make due with whatever tools you have around your home. Although you will quickly realise that this may not allow you to create high quality items. If you are simply doing this for fun, this is okay but if you want to improve and make items that look professional. In the 21st century, you have a range of equipment, tools and technology that will not only make the process more simple and fun, it will help you increase the quality of your products. You may think that this is an unnecessary investment but it will make a massive difference, particularly if you are planning to sell your items or even just wear them yourself.

Learn The Terminology

Once you start learning more about jewellery, you may notice that there are different names for processes and items that you just do not know what it means. It can be overwhelming and frustrating not knowing what the terminology is, especially if you want to invest in the appropriate tools. You will certainly learn this eventually as you progress, but it may be a good idea to learn the different means before you get started. This can be easily achieved through researching online, going to classes and asking people in the field.

Sell Your Pieces

You may want to start to make jewellery as a hobby and because you have a passion for it. However, you may be better at it than you expect and others may compliment your jewellery pieces constantly. If this is the case, you may consider setting your own shop and selling your pieces. At first, you can sell them to family, friends and colleagues at work to gauge how people react to your pieces and whether they sell. Once you are ready, you may want to start selling your pieces online or in an actual shop. Evidently, if you plan to go ahead with this, there is a lot to consider and to do, including managing your inventory and marketing your pieces. This may be a good idea if you are looking to make extra money out of a fun hobby that you love.

Learn About The Trade

Anytime you want to start something, you should aim to have some knowledge before you get started. The last thing you want is to invest time and money into something that will not be worth it and prove to be a waste. Even if you love wearing jewellery, this does not necessarily guarantee that you will enjoy making it. Before going ahead with this, make sure that you know a bit more about what will be required of you, even if you just want to do it for fun and do not care whether the pieces made are of good quality.

Have a Set Workspace

Having your own workspace is the best thing you can do for yourself, particularly if you do not leave alone. Once you start getting deeply into jewellery making, you will find that you have many tools and materials around, some of which can be tiny pieces and sharp items. If possible, try to have a designated space where you can work with no interruptions and leave your tools and pieces safe.

Look Around For Inspiration

It is okay for you not to know what to do as a beginner. If you are unsure of what pieces to create and where to start, find inspiration somewhere, whether it is with fellow jewellery makers or online and use this as motivation to get started and keep going.

Innovation centre launches entrepreneur accelerator programme

Coworking space and innovation centre Plexal has announced the launch of a new accelerator programme.

Plexal’s OpenDoor initiative will support products, services and projects that make work more inclusive and enable under-represented groups to access better business and economic opportunities.

The accelerator programme will give entrepreneurs access to marketing and messaging support, business model development, tailored introductions to partners, investors and corporates, as well as access to the Plexal Community and coworking space.

Russell Gundry, head of innovation strategy at Plexal, explained: “By supporting ventures that create better inclusion with the level of focus and drive usually given to start-ups and scaleups, we can make an enormous difference.

“We can’t wait to start working with first cohort on building more socially inclusive businesses, workspaces and policies.”

If you would like to find out more information, please visit https://www.plexal.com/about/

Business Excellence: Michael G. Rubin Billionaire Entrepreneur

Michael G. Rubin is an American businessman. He is the Chief Executive Officer of Kynetic, a direct-to-consumer e-commerce company he founded in 2011. He is also Executive Chairman at each of Kynetic’s three businesses: Fanatics, the world’s leading online seller of licensed sports merchandise; Rue La La, a flash sales site; and ShopRunner, a members-only service for online shoppers. He previously founded GSI Commerce in 1998, selling it on eBay in 2011 for $2.4 billion (USD).

Rubin also is a co-owner of the Philadelphia 76ers basketball team and the New Jersey Devils hockey team.

Rubin has been included in the Forbes 400: The Richest People in America and the Forbes: The World’s Billionaireslist. His networth, as of January 2019, is estimated to be $2.9 billion (USD).

UK entrepreneurs pledge support for construction skills initiative

An initiative designed to attract new talent into the built environment industry has secured the backing of entrepreneurs from three high-profile firms.

Black & White Engineering (B&W), s h e d and James Christopher Consulting are the latest companies to become sponsors of PlanBEE (Built Environment Education), a flexible training programme designed to attract and retain the brightest new talent in the region, plug skills gaps and create a more flexible workforce capable of working across various construction disciplines.

The initiative was launched in 2016 when Gateshead College and Ryder Architecture formed a powerful alliance with a network of architects, designers, contractors and engineering specialists.

Rather than follow a traditional training model where students complete their qualifications while working in one company, PlanBEE gives trainees the chance to work in several companies across the built environment industry.

This radical approach allows entrepreneurs to make their business more competitive and efficient by hiring staff with a more rounded understanding of the industry.

Students on the programme will now benefit from a wider range of expertise with B&W, s h e d and James Christopher Consulting on board.

Launched in the United Arab Emirates in 2007, B&W is a mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) design consultancy with offices in Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Baku, Manila, London and Newcastle. The company offers design and consultancy services to the construction industry worldwide and has worked on numerous large-scale iconic projects including high-rise towers, data centres, hotels, shopping malls and airports.

Steven Horn, director, in B&W’s Newcastle office, said: “We need to see more young people coming into our industry with knowledge of different areas of the built environment. The way PlanBEE is structured allows us to achieve this. The programme is ideal preparation for how we want to develop our staff, which is to give them opportunities to experience different ways of working on various projects around the world.”

Newcastle-based s h e d is a structural and civil engineering design consultancy that specialises in complex engineering design and Building Information Modelling (BIM), an approach that helps firms risk-assess projects at an early stage by generating intelligent 3D models of buildings before construction takes place.

Marc Horn of s h e d said: “Our expertise in BIM requires us to recruit staff with a rounded understanding of the built environment sector. PlanBEE enables us to achieve this because it moves away from traditional off-the-shelf training initiatives that shoehorn professionals into narrowly defined roles in a single company.”

James Christopher Consulting, an established engineering practice in Gateshead, offers design services to the built environment sector and works on a wide range of projects, from small-scale specialist structures to large-scale commercial developments including land reclamation and drainage works.

Technical director Craig Higgins said: “We were delighted to get involved with PlanBEE and were impressed with this novel approach to recruiting, training and developing staff. There’s a strong emphasis on the application of digital technologies to different types of construction projects and we want our workforce to be at the forefront of this revolution.”

Working with Gateshead College, the PlanBEE group has created a bespoke higher-level skills programme that provides budding professionals with study and off-the-job training at the college’s construction facility on Team Valley, along with a job working with some of the region’s leading companies. It has been tailored specifically for and by the North East construction sector, providing students with a starting salary of £10,700 per year, a professional qualification and a guaranteed job opportunity on graduation.

Established by Ryder Architecture, the initiative has already attracted some high-profile names, including Brims Construction, NBS, Desco (Design & Consultancy), BIM Academy, Sir Robert McAlpine, Xsite Architecture, Robertson, 3e Consulting, Cundall, Arup, FaulknerBrowns, Sadler Brown Architecture and Tolent.

Chris Toon, deputy principal at Gateshead College, said: “It’s great to have three additional sponsors on board. The industry has called for employees to be skilled in a greater range of disciplines, such as surveying, landscaping, architecture and planning, and PlanBEE addresses this fundamental need.

“We are proud to be at the forefront of an industry-led initiative that’s becoming a national exemplar for the recruitment and development of construction employees.”

Mark Thompson, managing partner at Ryder Architecture, added: “It’s fantastic to see the positive impact the programme is making on the students and sponsoring businesses, and we’re delighted to be welcoming the new sponsors to our third cohort.”

7 facts that are interesting to know about the future of accounting

Accounting, much like any industry, has seen its fair share of changes. It has proven to be a very challenging one too, but if you have a knack and drive for it then it might just turn out to be a really lucrative one.

People who are already in accounting or are planning to jump into it as a career, often think about the future of the industry and what will happen to it with the rapid technological development and automation being rolled. To answer that question and more, here are 7 interesting facts about the future of accounting.

1. You will not lose your job to technology

Yes, while we all harbour a small fear that we might just have to give up our work desk to a shiny robot, it is highly unlikely that an accountant will be replaced by a robot. However, with the advancements being made in artificial intelligence and enterprise resource software, you will be at the helm while the technology helps you do a better job.

2. The industry will keep thriving

With every day that passes entrepreneurship becomes increasingly popular which makes way for more and more start-ups to surface and eventually grow into companies. These very companies then seek out services in administrative procedures as well as financial ones which means accounting will never go out of business. Now is a time as good as any to be an accountant.

3. The more you are qualified the more you will grow

If you manage to get a master’s degree in accounting then you can rest assured that you will experience a career with a lot of room for salary growth. The extra time and money that you will invest in getting yourself a master’s degree will pay off twofold for you and more. So, take pass your official CPA exam as soon as you can and venture beyond that.

4. Having a specialty is sought out

It is true that hybrid careers have become the most sought-after ones such as people who have a degree in engineering as well as law or candidates who have a degree in finance and law as well. For accounting, however, if you can find yourself a niche and become an expert in it then you will be able to stick around in the industry for the long run. Try to take as many relevant courses as you can to grow your expertise.

5. International opportunities are abundant

With companies branching out and exploring new waters overseas, they send their delegates to form fronts and setups abroad. The core teams that go along include accountants so that they can cater to the corporation or enterprise away from home and it keeps it running as efficiently as they can.

6. There will always be opportunities in teaching

As future accountants enrol themselves for education in this domain, they will seek out business and finance schools to enable and provide them with the knowledge and the tools that they need. This is will be a cycle that will continue to go forever so you can try your hand in the field and in the classroom as well. Both experiences will benefit from the other.

7. Implications for Research

Accounting firms are conducting researches on the side as well to see the feasibility of new and upcoming technologies and the new kinds of frauds that come with those. Therefore, accountants with knowledge of digital technologies will help front the research endeavours which the entire industry will benefit from.

Which U.S. cities are most popular amongst start-ups?

After a slump amid the Great Recession, more and more start-ups are emerging and entrepreneurship has been on the rise since 2011. From creating jobs to boosting the economy, with this rise comes a number of benefits. People often associate entrepreneurs and start-ups with Silicon Valley, if not New York City or Boston, because a disproportionate share of venture capital investments flow to start-ups based in those cities. However, other metropolitan areas have been experiencing some under-the-radar growth.

Over the past year, 26 metropolitan areas across the country experienced a boost in growing start-ups, and the areas that saw the most substantial growth were Atlanta, Indianapolis and Portland, according to the Kauffman Foundation’s recently released its 2017 Index of Growth Entrepreneurship. The findings reveal not only how entrepreneurship is growing across the U.S., but where.

To rank the cities, the researchers took three factors into account: start-up growth rate, share of scale-ups and high-growth company density. Both start-up growth rate and share of scale-ups are employment-based measurements, and share of scaleups refers to companies that grew to 50 employees or more in less than 10 years of operation. High-growth company density, which is the only revenue-based measure of the study, looks at the proportion of “high-growth” companies — private companies that have at least $2 million in revenue and a minimum 20 percent growth over a three-year period — in a certain area.

So, wonder which cities have been bustling in the start-up scene? Look no further. Here are the top 10 cities with the most entrepreneurial activity, according to this year’s Kauffman Index of Growth Entrepreneurship.

1. Washington, DC

Washington, DC, has the best cumulative score across start-up growth rate, share of scale-ups and high-growth company density. Compared to the other 39 largest U.S. cities, the D.C. area has the highest density of high-growth companies. In other words, it’s the area with the largest proportion of businesses that earn more than $2 million in annual revenue and have seen 20 percent revenue growth over the past three years. In a recent survey of start-ups in D.C., 217 respondents said they planned to hire more than 1,000 people collectively in 2017.

2. Austin

Coming in second is the southern city of Austin. However, this is not very surprising, because Austin is recognized for being an entrepreneurial hub and also came in second place in last year’s Kauffman Index. The number of employees at an Austin company grows an average of 85 percent in the company’s first five years of operation. Austin also has the second-highest density of high-growth companies.

3. Columbus

Moving up a slot from last year, Columbus, Ohio, takes the bronze for the most entrepreneurial activity, according to the index. That’s largely because start-ups grow an average of 96 percent in their first five years, in terms of employment. While it’s not a usual suspect when it comes to the start-up scene, Columbus has the highest share of scale-ups of any city, at 2.5 percent. That means that around 25 out of every 1,000 Columbus firms founded in the past 10 years have scaled to at least 50 or more employees since they launched.

4. Nashville

Music isn’t the only thing Nashville should be famous for. Turns out, it’s also a bustling start-up city. Moving up a rank since last year, the southern city has a 95.6 percent start-up growth rate: The number of employees at a Nashville company grows an average of 95.6 percent in the company’s first five years. That’s on top of a 2.09 percent share of scale-ups, meaning about 209 of every 10,000 businesses in this area grows to 50 employees within its first decade.

5. Atlanta

Yet another southern city to make it into the index’s top 10 is Atlanta. In fact, just in the past year, Atlanta has seen major entrepreneurial action, moving up a whopping 10 slots from 2016, when it ranked 15th. That’s because employment at Atlanta new companies grows by an average of 112.6 percent in their first five years. The city also has a fairly large high-growth company density at 191.4 — that’s the number of companies out of 100,000 with annual revenues more than $2 million (and growing by 20 percent over a three-year period).

6. San Jose

Not a shocker, but important to note: San Jose is number six on this year’s list of the top 10 cities, moving down three slots since last year. While there’s still plenty going on in this area in terms of start-ups and venture capital investment, the city may have seen a drop because of a relatively low high-growth company density of 94.4 (out of 100,000). Its proportion of fast-growing companies with annual revenues of at least $2 million was lower than many other cities on the list.

7. San Francisco

Another not-so-shocking Bay Area addition to the list is San Francisco. This metropolitan area (which includes Oakland and Fremont, Calif.) saw the largest proportion of venture capital-backed business exits over the past year compared to other major cities, meaning there are a large number of what Kauffman identifies as “growth companies” in San Francisco and the East Bay. According to the study, venture exits include IPOs, acquisitions and buyouts. Meanwhile, the area has the fourth-highest rate of start-up growth, with an average employment growth rate of 106.9 percent within a start-up’s first five years.

8. Boston

Basically the Silicon Valley of the East Coast, Boston has also long been recognized as a very entrepreneurial city. That’s why it’s no surprise that it made the cut for this year’s top 10. Although it’s moved down two spots since 2016, Boston ranks fourth in terms of cities with the highest density of venture capital-backed business exits. Major companies that got their start in the city of Boston include Liberty Mutual, Marshalls, Samuel Adams and Timberland, to name a few.

9. Minneapolis

Shuffling from 16th place last year to ninth place this year, Minneapolis has the highest rate of start-up growth of any major U.S. city, with an average employment growth rate of 121.3 percent within a start-up’s first five years. The city is also home to the University of Minnesota, whose venture program has helped launched more than 100 companies in the past decade (82 percent of which are still in business), and last year alone helped give life to 17 new businesses.

10. Indianapolis

Also seeing a big improvement since 2016, Indianapolis moved up 10 places from 20th to 10th on the Kauffman list over the past year. Especially when it comes to tech, Indiana is seeing some major activity. According to a recent report by PwC, in 2016 alone, the state saw a total of 23 deals with a combined total of $51.5 million in fundraising just by new technology companies. When you extend beyond just tech, these numbers are even larger. Plus, according to Kauffman, about 220 of every 10,000 businesses in Indianapolis grows to 50 employees within its first decade.