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Fixed recoverable costs consultation

Fixed Recoverable Costs (FRC) prescribe the amount of damages that can be claimed back from a losing party in civil litigation; they are a way of controlling the legal costs by giving certainty in advance (by reference to grids of costs).

The civil justice system in England and Wales has a ‘loser pays’ model, whereby the unsuccessful party covers the costs of the successful party. This can lead to high costs for the unsuccessful party. FRC give both parties certainty as to the maximum amount they may have to pay if unsuccessful and can ensure that the costs of cases are proportionate to the sum in issue.

FRC currently operate in most low value personal injury cases. The government and senior judiciary announced their support for extending FRC in November 2016, and Sir Rupert Jackson, then a judge of the Court of Appeal, was commissioned by the senior judiciary to develop proposals. Sir Rupert’s report, which was published in July 2017, follows on from his major report of 2010 looking at civil costs more widely, which led to significant reforms to controlling costs, including ‘no win, no fee’ reforms in the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 (LASPO). Sir Rupert’s July 2017 supplementary report which focuses on the extension of FRC, completes his recommendations. We believe that it is now right to consider the extension of FRC.

We are seeking views from all those with an interest in civil costs in England and Wales. Our proposals, which are set out in the consultation paper, take forward Sir Rupert’s recommendations.

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Arc Legal expands Corporate team with new hire

Arc Legal Assistance (Arc Legal), a leading provider of legal expenses insurance (LEI) and assistance services provider in the UK and Republic of Ireland, has welcomed Kerry Knief as its new Senior Corporate Relations Manager.

Kerry joins Arc Legal with over twenty years’ experience in the insurance industry having previously worked for AXA Partners as a Senior Account Manager, managing key strategic clients, specialising in ancillary products.

Kerry’s new role will involve managing existing corporate relationships, with a focus on identifying growth opportunities with partners across Arc Legal’s ancillary product range.

Chief Commercial Officer, Peter Harvey commented;

“Further growth has prompted us to bolster our Corporate Relations team, and Kerry’s knowledge and experience in the ancillary products market makes her a great fit for us.”

“Kerry has a wealth of experience in the industry, and her appointment will help to ensure we continue to meet our growth ambitions for 2019 and beyond. She has a fantastic reputation in the industry and we are delighted to have her on board.”

Kerry Knief, Commented;

“I am very excited to be able to join the team here at Arc Legal, especially during this exciting period of continued growth and expansion. I am looking forward to hitting the ground running and contributing towards the continued success of the business.”

For more information about Arc Legal Assistance, please visit https://www.arclegal.co.uk/

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UK lawtech not yet disruptive, new research shows

Lawtech in the UK has a long way to go if it is to reach its potential, the Law Society of England and Wales said as it launched new research into the development and adoption of sector-specific technology.

In its Lawtech Adoption Report, the Law Society explores the UK’s burgeoning lawtech sector and highlights key developments in this area and what this means for the legal profession and the business of law.

Law Society president Christina Blacklaws said: “A range of drivers is accelerating development and adoption of lawtech, from an escalating need for efficiency, increasing workloads and complexity of work to client pressure on costs and shorter turnaround times.

“Some of the most notable growth areas are legal analytics, legal project management, governance and compliance and contract management.

“Lawtech in the UK is largely focused on efficiencies and automation rather than on delivering ‘new types of law’. As such it is less mature than other fields of digital disruption – such as fintech, where there is more funding and regulatory alignment.”

The business-to-business legal services market is the most mature, particularly within large law firms, where AI and machine learning-driven applications are ubiquitous. Some of the more established areas include collaboration tools, document management, IP management and e-billing.

The business-to-consumer legal market seems to be lagging behind. There is most traction in those law firms that are delivering large-scale commoditised services, where automation is principally all about driving efficiencies. For instance, chatbots, DIY law, robo-lawyers and triage tools are all becoming more common with a greater focus on the consumer experience.

“Our research found that law firms face barriers to adoption of many lawtech solutions that are fundamental to the industry, such as risks around compliance, the partnership and billable hours models,” Christina Blacklaws said.

“After several years of start-up activity, the sector is now ripe for a wave of consolidation and later stage funding. Adopting and pioneering new technologies will give firms a strong competitive advantage in a rapidly evolving legal services market.”

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Pint after work networking

It is being organised by Talbots Law Firm and will be running at The Great Western, Sun Street, from 5.30pm to 7.30pm for business professionals.

Those who sign up by 12 noon on Friday, February 8, get a free drink.

If you would like to attend this initiative, please email [email protected].

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Brexit has already created 3,500 technology jobs in Brussels

Thousands of tech jobs have moved to Brussels from the UK due to Brexit with expectations of more to come once Britain leaves the EU, according to a sector leader.

As many as 3,500 roles have already been relocated to the Belgium capital, said Juan Bossicard, president of Microsoft’s Innovation Centre in the city.

The stream of tech workers leaving the UK began in the summer of 2016, Mr Bossicard told the New Statesman.

“Since Brexit began, 3,500 jobs have moved here from the UK and we expect far more to come after Brexit officially happens,” he said.

Mr Bossicard said Brexit offered a “huge opportunity” for Brussels, and added the city has a lot of offer UK companies, including single market access and good links to other European countries.

Ahead of the EU referendum, job losses linked to Brexit were forecast to be in the hundreds of thousands but since the vote these projections have been curtailed.

However, the Bank of England has said that Britain is set to lose 5,000 financial services jobs by 29 March next year, a prediction backed by the Treasury.

MPs are set to begin debating Theresa May’s Brexit deal, with a vote on the agreement due to take place in the coming days.

On Tuesday, an official at the European Court of Justice said Article 50 could be unilaterally revoked, sending the pound up against the dollar and the euro.

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Who’s switching jobs? People moves for October 12th

The latest news for People on the Move, including insights and opinions from employment experts around the globe.

Octopus Property

Specialist property lender Octopus Property, part of the Octopus Group, announced the appointment of Paula Purdy as business development manager (BDM), north of England, reporting directly to D’mitri Zaprzala, Head of Sales. Paula’s appointment follows on from the three regional BDM hires announced last month, with representatives now established across the UK. Paula brings over 17 years of residential, commercial, buy-to-let and bridging lending experience. She joins Octopus Property from Shawbrook Bank, where she was head of sales, residential mortgages, increasing business and raising Shawbrook’s profile amongst intermediaries. Paula will be responsible for deepening relationships with introducers, alongside building new ones, in and around major North of England cities including Chester, Liverpool, Crewe and Warrington, leveraging Octopus Property’s residential, commercial and development product range.

White & Case LLP

Global law firm White & Case has expanded its global project finance practice with the addition of Simon Caridia as a new partner in London. Simon focuses his practice on debt financings for infrastructure M&A and private equity transactions. He advises industry sponsors, infrastructure and private equity funds, commercial bank lenders, multilateral agencies, institutional investors and host governments on brownfield transactions and greenfield projects, including acquisitions, refinancing’s, restructurings, project finance and public-private partnerships. He joins White & Case from Herbert Smith Freehills, where he was a partner. “There are very few lawyers in the London market who can match Simon’s reputation, experience and market knowledge in relation to advising clients on debt financing for infrastructure M&A and private equity deals,” said White & Case partner Mark Castillo-Bernaus.

Houlihan Lokey

Houlihan Lokey, the global investment bank, yesterday announced that David Brock had joined the firm as a managing director in its industrials group, focused on the building products sector. He is based in London. David joins from Jefferies, where he was a managing director and head of the construction and building materials group. Prior to Jefferies, he was also a managing director and head of the construction and building materials group at Deutsche Bank. David’s previous experience also includes equity research roles in the building products sector at Credit Suisse and HSBC. “I am excited for the opportunity to be part of this momentum and to be joining the market-leading Industrials team,” David said.