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Nationally Recognised Solar Engineer Completes First Feasibility Study

NEW YORK, NY, July 22, 2021 – Green Stream Holdings Inc. (OTC PINK:GSFI) (“the Company”) (https://greensolarutility.com), an emerging leader in the solar utility and finance space, previously announced earlier this month that it had engaged KMB Design Group, a nationally known a full service engineering solutions provider with extensive international expertise in the solar renewable energy field providing photovoltaic design and engineering services, to assist the Company in installing three ground-mount solar farms. Today, the Company is announcing that the survey for one of the three sites is completed, and that the property owner has signed an agreement.

KMB was initially hired to conduct solar feasibility studies for three separate locations in the State of New York. Each site is 37 acres. Their study will determine the most efficient configuration for the arrays, estimated production matters, utility interconnect feasibility & process, as well as identifying any potential incentive programs.

The survey for the first of the three locations, 312 Cornish Hill Road, Cooperstown, N.Y. is completed and the owner has signed a 25-year lease for the property.

KMB is a full-service engineering solutions provider that has provided designs and engineering services for over 1,000 projects and 1,500 MW for a wide range of solar installations from small scale to large scale. KMB Design Group is at the forefront of the escalating solar industry and is considered a leading consulting firm in the renewable energy field providing photovoltaic design and engineering services. Licensed in 50 states. They have the ability to work nationally without limitations.

About KMB Design Group

KMB is a full-service engineering solutions provider licensed in the United States and Europe. We take a systematic approach to developing comprehensive solutions for our clients, guiding projects from conception through site acquisition, engineering and construction. We focus on collaboration and communication throughout the process to achieve mutual success for our clients and our firm. We take a systematic approach to develop comprehensive engineering solutions for our clients, guiding projects from conception through site acquisition, engineering & construction. We focus on collaboration and communication throughout the process to achieve mutual success for our clients and our firm.

KMB Design Group, LLC was founded by a team of seasoned professionals who have been working together for over 15 years. Their extensive experience in the engineering and telecommunications industries provide a great foundation for a successful design firm. KMB’s focus on technology and continuous improvement enables the firm to keep up with the latest innovations and provide state-of-the-art design solutions for our clients. KMB continues to look for strategic acquisitions as well as potential joint ventures to grow the firm and expand our services.

KMB is licensed in 50 states and in Europe allowing us to do business both nationally and internationally.

About Green Stream Finance, Inc.

Green Stream Finance, Inc., a solar utility and finance company with satellite offices in Malibu, CA and New York, NY, is focused on exploiting currently unmet markets in the solar energy space, and is currently licensed in California, Nevada, Arizona, Washington, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, New Mexico, Colorado, Hawaii, and Canada. The Company’s next-generation solar greenhouses constructed and managed by Green Rain Solar, LLC, a Nevada-based division, utilise proprietary greenhouse technology and trademarked design developed by world-renowned architect Mr. Antony Morali. The Company is currently targeting high-growth solar market segments for its advanced solar greenhouse and advanced solar battery products. The Company has a growing footprint in the significantly underserved solar market in New York City where it is targeting 50,000 to 100,000 square feet of rooftop space for the installation of its solar panels. Green Stream is looking to forge key partnership with major investment groups, brokers, and private investors in order to capitalise on a variety of unique investment opportunities in the commercial solar energy markets. The Company is dedicated to becoming a major player in this critical space. Through its innovative solar product offerings and industry partnerships, the Company is well-positioned to become a significant player in the solar space. Please visit: https://greensolarutility.com.

About Chuck’s Vintage:

Chuck’s Vintage, a division, provides its clients access to historical fashion accessories, garments and complete ensembles from a bygone era. In these times of uncertainty, and ever-changing conditions, , Chuck’s Vintage is doing its best to provide clients with a consistent white glove experience. Come to Chuck’s for the denim but stick around and complete your look with the founder’s sampling of vintage American workwear: rugged military and work boots, buttery leather bomber jackets, and soft, perfectly worn-in vintage 70’s rock tees. Classic American Cool.

Chuck’s Vintage was founded by GSFI former CEO Madeline Cammarata (fka Madeline Harmon), who hailed from an illustrious background in fashion. Her career began as a fashion model, where she was soon discovered by the iconic and provocative fashion photographer Helmet Newton, launching Cammarata to the runways of Europe. Returning to the US, Madeline found a powerful niche in the high fashion world of denim, where she was instrumental in providing fabric development for powerful brands like 7 For All Mankind and provided thousands of pieces to celebrity and business elites from Steve Jobs to Morrisey and everywhere in between. Please visit: https://chucksvintage.com.

Forward-Looking Statements:

This press release contains forward-looking information within the meaning of section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and is subject to the safe harbour created by those sections. This material contains statements about expected future events and/or financial results that are forward-looking in nature and subject to risks and uncertainties. That includes the possibility that the business outlined in this press release cannot be concluded for some reason. That could be as a result of technical, installation, permitting or other problems that were not anticipated. Such forward-looking statements by definition involve risks, uncertainties and other factors, which may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of Green Stream Finance, Inc. to be materially different from the statements made herein. Except for any obligation under the U.S. federal securities laws, Green Stream Finance, Inc. undertakes no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

For All Inquiries Contact:
Phone: +1 (424) 280-4096
Email: [email protected]

SOURCE: Green Stream Holdings Inc.

Website: https://greensolarutility.com
Instagram: chucksvintage original
Phone: +1 (646) 669-7007

Drive to increase awareness of engineering ethics

Engineering Ethics 2028 describes a proposed new ethical framework for the profession and how it can be introduced over the next nine years. It says the fundamental duty of an engineer should be to serve the public interest.

The vision was developed by ethicists at the University of Leeds.

One of the big issues, though, is that the majority of engineers, around three million people, are not affiliated with a professional engineering institution, and fall outside of any professional oversight.

“More than ever [engineers] need to consider the interests of the public in the work they do.” ~ Dr Jim Baxter, Inter-Disciplinary Ethics Applied Centre

The vision states: “…the majority of engineers are currently outside the scope of the profession’s efforts to improve or maintain their competence…or to engage them in the work of the PEIs (Professional Engineering Institutions) and RAEng (Royal Academy of Engineering) which includes public engagement on ethical issues…”

Dr Jim Baxter, from the Inter-Disciplinary Ethics Applied Centre at the University of Leeds who authored the vision, said: “Engineers who are not members of a professional institutions are not necessarily ignoring their ethical and professional responsibilities but being part of a professional body strengthens the likelihood that those obligations will be met.

“Engineering Ethics 2028 has to be set against the context of rapid technological change, and that change will have an impact on all our lives.

“The people who are key to inventing, designing and building this technology are engineers.

“More than ever, they need to consider the interests of the public in the work that they do.”

Have your say

Do you want to comment on Engineering Ethics 2028? By clicking on the link, you can read the vision and have your say on its contents.

Dr Baxter added: “Engineers have the power to do tremendous good but technology can also be harmful. The ethics vision, if the profession adopts it, will ensure they think about public opinion and the public good – and in some cases, they might have to say ‘no’ to a project.”

Engineering Ethics 2028 was drawn-up following discussion with leaders from the engineering profession, including the Royal Academy of Engineering (RAEng), the Engineering Professors’ Council and Engineers Without Borders UK.

The vision builds on work that started back in 2003 by the RAEng to define the ethical values underlying engineering work. Two years later, the RAEng and Engineering Council jointly published their Statement of Ethical Principles.

Those principles were ground-breaking in that they said everyone involved in engineering was “…required to maintain and promote high ethical standards and challenge unethical behaviour.”

There was also an expectation that engineers should keep their knowledge up to date and “…hold paramount the health and safety of others and draw attention to hazards.”

But in 2016, a major review into the structure of UK engineering was undertaken by John Uff QC. He quoted estimates that only 15% of engineers, around one in six, were members of a professional body.

Ethical vision

The proposed vision says efforts need to be targeted at bringing more engineers “…within the boundaries of the profession.”

The recent inquiry chaired by the engineer Dame Judith Hackitt into building regulations, established after the Grenfell Tower fire in 2017, identified a lack of any formal process to validate the skills of people involved in the management of high-rise buildings as a major flaw in the regulatory system.

Engineering Ethics 2028 suggests that the profession needs to:

  • Increase the number of engineers who are registered with a professional engineering institution and thereby bring them within the scope of professional conduct.
  • Promote a greater recognition by engineers that ethics is a fundamental part of their work.
  • Ensure engineers are aware of the impact technological innovations will have on society and that projects maximise public benefits and minimise risks.
  • To work sustainably.

Engineering Ethics 2028 was drawn up following discussions with the Engineering Council, the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Engineering Professors’ Council and Engineers without Borders UK.

Engineers and engineering organisations can comment on the consultation up to January 25th 2020.

Hadef & Partners strengthens Engineering and Construction practice

Leading independent UAE law firm Hadef & Partners welcomes Paul Suckling as a Partner into the Engineering & Construction team. Paul joins following a period as in-house counsel for an International Contractor and has over 16 years’ experience in the Middle East.

A dual-qualified solicitor and quantity surveyor; Paul specialises in construction litigation.

A major facet of Paul’s practice involves acting for clients in a Project Counsel role. This entails being active throughout the Project’s various phases, be it advising on the formulation and negotiation of all contract documentation, contractual and legal issues as they arrive, through to the final account process of a Project, as well as running big ticket arbitrations in the Gulf region.

Sadiq Jafar, Managing Partner of the Dubai office of Hadef & Partners commented:

“We are pleased to further strengthen our Engineering & Construction team with the appointment of Paul. His vast regional experience and his ability to understand both the technical and commercial issues involved in construction matters ensures he provides.

If you would like to get more information about Hadef & Partners, please visit http://www.hadefpartners.com/

Industry predictions: Engineering, Construction and Infrastructure

2019 will see a digital leap forward as many construction companies explore implementing integrated business software into projects for the very first time.

Tighter margins, global skills shortages and new industry entrants are all ramping up the pressure on traditional construction businesses to deliver greater productivity and more integrated, cost-efficient projects, on time, every time.

1. Prediction

50% of all construction projects worldwide will include modular content by 2022, driven by the growing global skills shortage.

In March 2018, a new factory opened outside Liverpool, England employing 150 people 24 hours a day. What does it manufacture? Homes—starting with a first order of 81 homes and 58 apartments, as part of a first-year target of 450 homes. And it’s just one among many. At IFS, in 2018 we had four times greater customer activity around modular construction than in any previous year.

From schools in Ireland to prisons and hospitals in the United States; from sustainable luxury apartments to vast workers’ dormitories, 2018 has seen modular construction go well beyond hype. In 2019 it will get even stronger, with housing shortages a key driver. The UN estimates that over 2 billion new homes will need to be built over the next two years. Modular manufacturing enables affordable houses to be built faster and at higher volume. Driven by a worldwide shortage in skills and housing, increased modular construction will impact the construction industry massively in 2019.

New entrants will make agility even more essential.

For a start, we’re already seeing a wave of new entrants coming into the industry. Take that modular housing factory in Liverpool. Neither of the two founders came from the construction industry. One, Luke Barnes, was a design engineer, his partner a software engineer. Barnes told reporters: “I found there was a big gap in the market as there were no constructors that offered the quality, deliverability and competitive pricing I was searching for.”

2019 will see growing numbers of traditional construction companies begin opening modular factories to stay competitive. And more new players enter the industry—from manufacturing, supply chain and logistics, to local governments, banks and insurance companies. Many will be able to offer flexible finance and service packages too.

The pressure on incumbent building firms to adapt will be huge. They’ll need tighter control and more adaptability over every aspect of their projects. Proving they can, if necessary, partner up with larger networks of suppliers, offer services and maintenance on assets once built, include equipment hire, and yes, even offer or manufacture some modular units or components. It all adds up to an urgent need for better, more integrated digital management of complex, demanding projects. That need is driving my second industry prediction.

2. Prediction

In 2019 more construction companies than ever before will start trying out integrated business software – for the very first time.

10% of traditional construction firms could go out of business over the next 5 years. Competition around delivery and productivity will be fierce. Many companies will find themselves balanced on a knife-edge of opportunity: On the one hand growing urban populations and housing shortages will mean more demand and higher order intake. On the other, shrinking profit margins and increased competition will mean unprecedented pressure on productivity and delivery.

As a result, 2019 will see more firms moving from being document-driven to data-driven. Many will take their first steps into digital and make their first investments in integrated business systems like Enterprise Resource Planning, or ERP. Two main drivers will turn integrated business systems like ERP from a nice-to-have into a need-to-have.

When less is more: Growing pressure on margins.

With profit margins as tight as they are, many construction firms feel as if the more business they bring in—the less money they make. A recent Deloitte report found that construction companies’ profit margins are under pressure in several European submarkets, with Western Europe particularly vulnerable. In the UK, Belgium, the Netherlands and Ireland profit margins are so narrow they may not even be offset by higher order intake. 31% of the UK’s largest contractors reported a fall in margins in November 2017, with the country’s largest 10 contractors having a negative average margin of -0.5%.

New entrants: China, Korea… and Amazon?

Global competition is growing powerfully, impacting European construction companies hard. The Engineering News Record’s Top 100 Global Contractors In for 2017 found that European firms made up only 23% of the world’s Top 100 Global Contractors in 2017.

In 2010, 44% had been European. Compare that to Asia, which rose from 41% in 2010 to 51% in 2017, and the big picture is clear. Most analysts predict that China, India and the US will all be winners in the forecasted 8 trillion USD growth expected in construction by 2030—but not Europe.

Companies like China Communications Construction, Hyundai Engineering & Construction and Samsung C&T represent a serious threat to large European incumbents. Taken by revenue alone, even by 2017 the Top Four and seven out of the world’s Top Ten largest construction companies were all Chinese.

With many able to offer highly competitive and flexible financing packages. As we’ve seen, the rise in modular is bringing in new entrants from the manufacturing, supply chain and software engineering sectors. And given all this, who knows, could even digital giants like Amazon or Uber one day see construction as a sector ripe for disruption? If so, who’d put money on the industry in its present state surviving the challenge?

The bottom line is that many construction companies are highly exposed. In 2018, we saw huge ongoing efforts to drive efficiencies, increase productivity and establish repeatable delivery. In 2019, the pressure will be even more intense. The need for adaptability has never been more urgent. 2019 will be the year when many companies finally start considering systems like ERP not as isolated back-office finance functions essential, joined-up systems that provide urgent coherence, speed and efficiency throughout a project or business. 2019 could be the year when construction takes a giant leap forward, embracing digital adoption.

3. Prediction

Digital asset life cycle management, integrating both BIM and ERP, will emerge as a future need-to-have.

The collapse of Carillion, one of the UK’s largest construction giants, sent shockwaves through the construction industry. The company built and maintained major assets such as schools, prisons, hospitals and power stations across the UK—before collapsing 1.7 billion euros in debt, overnight, in January 2018. While analysts have endlessly debated how and why, insiders point to many systemic faults.

Certainly, in a company that size, spread over that many projects, it seems fair to say that without a central, integrated business system it would be all too easy for senior management to get a full picture of the truth. For the truth to be hidden. And for projects to be kept separate and siloed, financially and operationally.

Central to ERP’s power for construction companies is its ability to connect and integrate all functions in a project—from finance to operations to design—enabling maximum adaptability. I’ve always argued that Building Information Modelling (BIM) will be a driver of digital asset life cycle management and integration. BIM is an integral part of moving from a document-driven to data-driven world. In 2019, I believe we’ll see the first construction companies take their first steps into discussing how to merge and build on the strengths of combining the two systems: BIM and ERP.

Many firms have now started to integrate BIM models into their business. But building BIM on its own without an integrated business system, is only a small part of the picture. As a business system, ERP takes all the functions of the business and provides it with one set of data, enabling it to flow through a project’s life cycle all the way from inception to disposal, and enabling any combination of service or asset management in between.

For manufacturers, integrating ERP as a whole business system, rather than a single financial tool, is old news. They’ve been successfully integrating CAD with ERP for years. However, for many companies in the construction industry, that journey remains to be made. But 2019 will see many taking their first, vital steps.

UK entrepreneurs pledge support for construction skills initiative

An initiative designed to attract new talent into the built environment industry has secured the backing of entrepreneurs from three high-profile firms.

Black & White Engineering (B&W), s h e d and James Christopher Consulting are the latest companies to become sponsors of PlanBEE (Built Environment Education), a flexible training programme designed to attract and retain the brightest new talent in the region, plug skills gaps and create a more flexible workforce capable of working across various construction disciplines.

The initiative was launched in 2016 when Gateshead College and Ryder Architecture formed a powerful alliance with a network of architects, designers, contractors and engineering specialists.

Rather than follow a traditional training model where students complete their qualifications while working in one company, PlanBEE gives trainees the chance to work in several companies across the built environment industry.

This radical approach allows entrepreneurs to make their business more competitive and efficient by hiring staff with a more rounded understanding of the industry.

Students on the programme will now benefit from a wider range of expertise with B&W, s h e d and James Christopher Consulting on board.

Launched in the United Arab Emirates in 2007, B&W is a mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) design consultancy with offices in Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Baku, Manila, London and Newcastle. The company offers design and consultancy services to the construction industry worldwide and has worked on numerous large-scale iconic projects including high-rise towers, data centres, hotels, shopping malls and airports.

Steven Horn, director, in B&W’s Newcastle office, said: “We need to see more young people coming into our industry with knowledge of different areas of the built environment. The way PlanBEE is structured allows us to achieve this. The programme is ideal preparation for how we want to develop our staff, which is to give them opportunities to experience different ways of working on various projects around the world.”

Newcastle-based s h e d is a structural and civil engineering design consultancy that specialises in complex engineering design and Building Information Modelling (BIM), an approach that helps firms risk-assess projects at an early stage by generating intelligent 3D models of buildings before construction takes place.

Marc Horn of s h e d said: “Our expertise in BIM requires us to recruit staff with a rounded understanding of the built environment sector. PlanBEE enables us to achieve this because it moves away from traditional off-the-shelf training initiatives that shoehorn professionals into narrowly defined roles in a single company.”

James Christopher Consulting, an established engineering practice in Gateshead, offers design services to the built environment sector and works on a wide range of projects, from small-scale specialist structures to large-scale commercial developments including land reclamation and drainage works.

Technical director Craig Higgins said: “We were delighted to get involved with PlanBEE and were impressed with this novel approach to recruiting, training and developing staff. There’s a strong emphasis on the application of digital technologies to different types of construction projects and we want our workforce to be at the forefront of this revolution.”

Working with Gateshead College, the PlanBEE group has created a bespoke higher-level skills programme that provides budding professionals with study and off-the-job training at the college’s construction facility on Team Valley, along with a job working with some of the region’s leading companies. It has been tailored specifically for and by the North East construction sector, providing students with a starting salary of £10,700 per year, a professional qualification and a guaranteed job opportunity on graduation.

Established by Ryder Architecture, the initiative has already attracted some high-profile names, including Brims Construction, NBS, Desco (Design & Consultancy), BIM Academy, Sir Robert McAlpine, Xsite Architecture, Robertson, 3e Consulting, Cundall, Arup, FaulknerBrowns, Sadler Brown Architecture and Tolent.

Chris Toon, deputy principal at Gateshead College, said: “It’s great to have three additional sponsors on board. The industry has called for employees to be skilled in a greater range of disciplines, such as surveying, landscaping, architecture and planning, and PlanBEE addresses this fundamental need.

“We are proud to be at the forefront of an industry-led initiative that’s becoming a national exemplar for the recruitment and development of construction employees.”

Mark Thompson, managing partner at Ryder Architecture, added: “It’s fantastic to see the positive impact the programme is making on the students and sponsoring businesses, and we’re delighted to be welcoming the new sponsors to our third cohort.”