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How To Maximise Business Awards for Your Advertising

There are several marketing opportunities to take advantage of during the application process if you have chosen to pursue a business award.

Whether you succeed or fail in the competition, the opportunities can still provide your company a competitive edge, make it stand out, and make an impression on customers.

In this post, we examine the plethora of marketing opportunities that present themselves prior to, during, and after the event. When properly utilised, they can assist you in bringing attention to your company, spreading awareness, and promoting crucial goods, services, or ideas.

Using the Marketing Opportunities Presented by Business Awards

Every business award has a natural build-up, and you can use this natural build-up to your advantage in your marketing by using the excitement and “buzz” surrounding the event.

Utilise blog postings, social media, and consumer communications to be outspoken and visible as the excitement for the event grows.

Take into Account these Strategies when Creating Your Communication Content:

  1. See who you are up against if you are on a short list that has been released. Create arguments, illustrations, and data that show how you are superior to your competitors.
  2. Create a series of articles with recurring themes based on the main points of your contribution. Articles, white papers, blog entries, social media updates, case studies, films, infographics, etc. are examples of this type of content.
  3. Promote the awards; the sponsors will be impressed. Use hashtags related to the awards on social media as well. Award organisers are sure to be watching this and will share, like, or retweet your updates. This will consequently place you in front of more people.
  4. Create several campaigns to persuade clients, contacts, and suppliers to cast ballots on your behalf if you need their support in the event. Don’t think one campaign will be sufficient. Make it simple for people to access the voting mechanism in your messages by, for example, sharing the URL and routinely directing people there. Encourage everyone on your team to share this information with others.

Business Awards: Are They Worth It?

In light of the time and effort required to submit an award, it’s crucial to assess if doing so is a wise financial decision for your company. Analyse the effects of your participation in an award ceremony over the subsequent 12 months.

What advantages has it given you:

  • more media coverage?
  • access to fresh contacts and clients?
  • improvements in sales, inquiries, and client loyalty?
  • improvements in employee retention and recruitment?

To determine whether your participation in the awards has led to the results you wanted, compare these to your initial goals. And if it has and is helping your company expand, think about what other distinctions would be important to explore.

Some honours are cumulative, while others work best together. You might discover that more awards are now within your reach once you’ve won one.

Conclusion

Incorporating business awards into your advertising strategy can be a game-changer for your brand’s visibility and credibility. By carefully selecting awards, creating compelling content, leveraging social media, optimising for SEO, and monitoring your efforts, you can maximise the benefits of your award wins. Remember, the journey doesn’t end with a single award – it’s a continuous process of showcasing your commitment to excellence and innovation.

The Dos and Don’ts When Designing a Law Firm

With millennials expected to comprise 75 percent of the workforce by 2030, law firm design trends are being driven by an evolving culture that prioritises individual workplace experiences, health and well-being and ubiquitous technology.

The future of law firm design is rooted in change. Designers are not just designers anymore—they’re change management consultants.

Architects and contractors often work with law firms’ human resources teams, facilities managers and the lawyers themselves to align the existing workforce culture with a realistic design approach.

Recruitment and Retention

Just because you build it, doesn’t mean they will come, and one size does not fit all. It boils down to getting to know your people, recognising the culture and understanding the aspirations of young attorneys moving up in the workplace before applying something across the board.

For example, the idea behind open office workstations for attorneys is rooted in thoughtful cost reduction, however there are many factors that influence whether that may or may not work, including the ever-present client confidentiality factor and requisite privacy.

Junior-level attorneys still view the location and size of their office, and migrating from a smaller to a larger office, as a reflection of professional progress. They aspire to the highly coveted “corner office” or larger office. It seems that private offices, whether varied in size or a universal size, are a permanent fixture in law firms for myriad reasons.

Workplace Experience

While the value proposition of a dedicated private office is still strong in law firms, attorneys appreciate having choices or offices available to them outside of the four walls of their office. If the technology is available to support them, attorneys are placing more value on breakaway spaces in which to work in a collaborative setting or in an environment that is still solitary but in a different footprint, such as a comfortable-yet-functional indoor “lounge” space or outdoor space for mild weather.

It has become necessary to provide law firm attorneys and staff with options to show consideration of the individual workplace experience.

Given the tremendous pressure placed on attorneys to maximise billable hours, the more opportunities they are given to leave their desks, work solitarily in a different room surrounded by something different on the wall or a different colour, with different acoustics or even meet in a small room or hang out in the café, the better.

Health and Well-being

Wellness is paramount for overworked law firm attorneys and staff. While the legal industry has historically been a slow adopter of modern office trends, it’s taking a step forward in wellness. Law firms are showing greater sensitivity to nutrition through a fresh market kind of approach, offering fruit, yogurt and different water options as opposed to soda and candy bars in vending machines.

Many new law firm offices feature yoga and retreat rooms, which are only starting to be featured in other markets.

Perhaps most significantly, many law firms are creating a director of well-being role, charged with cultivating a healthy work environment and helping drive work life balance initiatives. Well known for their long hours and the struggle to maintain work life balance, law firms, beginning with office design decisions, must adopt more sensitive and thoughtful initiatives that contribute to the well-being of their people. This will help to avoid the increased trend of younger associates burning out and leaving the industry for good.

Ubiquitous Tech

In order to achieve work-life balance, law firms must create and follow through on work-remote policies. To successfully support such a policy, firms need a strong technology infrastructure. Ubiquitous technology is the idea that attorneys and law firm staff can be technologically supported both internally in the workplace and externally outside of the office.

Although client confidentiality concerns preclude certain platforms and technologies from being stored on the cloud, ubiquitous technology holds law firms accountable to make investments on speedy infrastructure previously limited due to operational cost controls.

In 2005, large law firms invested in technology in their conference centres, but not on the work floor. Now they are spending more throughout their spaces on AV because it’s critical to their business. Tenant workplace investment has shifted away from high-end finishes, millwork and stone to greater investment in technology and glass facades that introduce light to the interior desks sitting just outside of the perimeter office landscape.

Future-Proofing

Future-proofing a law firm is more possible than ever, but it requires clients to spend a great deal of time planning and analysing what role the workplace will need to serve seven to eight years into a lease term. Firms must budget accordingly to accommodate the impact of fool proof flexibility.

Potential growth, staff increases, space decreases, infrastructure concerns with shifting technology and future density must all be taken into account to minimise capital expenditure over the lease term.

If possible, companies should utilise a modular approach to allow for inexpensive future changes, budget accordingly and plan for what-if factors. Firms must consider the repercussions of changes; for example, what elements would be costly to move if a wall comes down, such as a sprinkler system, and which are more flexible, such as lighting?