Posts

Dentons HPRP provides legal assistance to Amazon Data Services

Dentons HPRP has been appointed to provide legal assistance to PT Amazon Data Services Indonesia (“ADSI”). ADSI has been established as a data storage service provider in Indonesia as part of Amazon’s global expansion. Dentons HPRP will be responsible for providing legal advice and assistance in relation to projects and corporations in Indonesia.

Recently, a team from Dentons HPRP, led by Partner Hendra Ong, and supported by Associate lawyers Hapsari Arumdati and Yolla Wietanto, assisted the company in reviewing, negotiating, furnishing and executing contracts with 3 units of PT PLN (Persero) for supplying electricity to support ADSI’s business operations in Indonesia.

PT Amazon Data Services Indonesia is an Indonesian subsidiary company and a part of the corporate group Amazon.com, Inc., an American multinational technology company based in Seattle and the world’s largest online marketplace.

As a leading law firm with wide-ranging and in-depth knowledge in business and corporate actions, Dentons HPRP has been providing strategic advisory and comprehensive legal assistance to corporations in their businesses in Indonesia. For more details on our services, please contact the partner listed under the key contact.

5 eCommerce Brands who recently launched with Storefront

Digitally native companies are increasingly testing pop-up stores around the world to drive buzz, increase visibility and test new concepts. From giants like Amazon to smaller etailers like M.M.LaFleur, Storefront has helped hundreds of eCommerce brands pop up this year in cities like New York, Los Angeles, London and Amsterdam.

For these retail brands who started their business online, a physical retail presence is helping to drive more foot traffic, increase sales and even open a more long-term brick-and-mortar space. Here are 5 of Storefront’s favourite eCommerce brands that opened pop-up stores this year:

Rue Saint Paul

Rue Saint Paul is a new luxury lifestyle brand with a mission to help women live beautifully. They curate pieces from around the world that are made in small batches, by hand, and of sustainable materials. The brand is now testing pop-up stores to tell the story of the brand and pieces to customers in person, and to test out their retail strategy before they make an investment in a permanent location of their own.

Amazon

The eCommerce giant has been testing pop-up stores since last year, and turned to Storefront to host its first-ever pop-up store in Amsterdam to learn more about its Dutch consumers. Having just launched Amazon Prime in the Netherlands, Amazon was keen to “see what would happen if we popped up in Amsterdam,” states Nick Caplin, Amazon’s Head of European Communications, and to build relationships with its customers there. The store was open for two days and “ beat its targets for the amount of people attending”.

MM.LaFleur

MM LaFleur, the popular clothing line for professional women, has been on a pop-up world tour in the last few years, making stops all over the country to expand its retail concept, drive foot traffic and launch its showroom pop-up spaces. Storefront spoke with their Director of Retail last year to get the inside scoop on its retail launches and her tips for opening a pop-up store were: “they need to be impactful, create a sense of urgency, and be a value add for the customer.”

Reset

Reset was born out of a need for effortless, flattering and affordable clothing. It launched in May 2018 and has since been focusing on physical pop-up locations to increase visibility, brand awareness, and sales. While testing out several standalone pop-up stores, the brand has also been recently collaborating with Bloomingdales to open up pop-up concepts. and just booked this Storefront space in San Francisco for 6 months, encouraging customers to “start their Reset” and introduce popular, everyday essentials.

Code8

New beauty brand Code8 is popping up in the heart of London’s Mayfair at the Burlington Arcade, a historic landmark. The brand, launched last November, was created to simplify makeup by curating universally flattering colors to suit every skintone. The brand was founded by Nadine Ayache and Sophia Chikovani, who set out to simplify the world of cosmetics for consumers, and are set to launch even more pop-up stores in 2019. In this Storefront-powered space, the brand has successfully executed a space that’s been drawing tons of consumers with lots of offerings and experiences in store.

Ebay paid UK corporation tax of £1.6m in 2016

The UK arm of eBay paid only £1.6m in corporation tax last year, even though its US parent had total revenues from its UK operations of $1.32bn (£1bn).

Ebay’s UK accounts record only £200m in revenues, which came entirely from a Swiss parent firm, seemingly for acting as its advertising agency.

The company declined to explain how its UK revenues were not booked though its UK business. However, an eBay spokesman said its tax affairs were entirely legal.

“In all countries and at all times, eBay is fully compliant with national, EU and international tax rules including those of the OECD, including the remittance of VAT to the appropriate authorities,” he said.

The pre-tax profit eBay UK made on its revenues in 2016 was £7.7m, according to the accounts, and it was on this figure that the UK corporation tax was levied.

Ebay is a huge international business that makes money mainly from advertisers and the commission on sales made through its auction site.

The total revenues of $1.32bn that the parent US business generated from the UK included those from subsidiaries such as the Stubhub ticket exchange and Gumtree classifieds site.

Within the group, the UK arm of eBay is wholly owned by eBay International, which is based in Switzerland and is itself owned by eBay in the US.

The firm’s UK accounts describe the role of eBay UK as providing “services to eBay International by recommending market penetration and advertising strategies for the UK internal marketplace and related third party advertising sales in the UK, Germany, Italy, Belgium and Australia”.

The seeming ability of the company to shelter most its UK profits from the UK tax authorities raises again the ability of big international companies to route their revenues to the countries with the most favourable tax regimes.

This has led in the past few years to intense scrutiny of the tax practices of big firms such as Apple, Amazon, Google and Starbucks.

Ebay in the US, whose international revenues hit $9bn last year, acknowledged that its tax affairs were under scrutiny in several countries, which may leave it with more tax to pay.

“The material jurisdictions where we are subject to potential examination by tax authorities for tax years after 2002 include, among others, the US (Federal and California), Germany, Korea, Israel, Switzerland, United Kingdom and Canada,” its US accounts said.