Silo Pharma Enters Into Sponsored Research Agreement

Englewood Cliffs, NJ, October 27, 2021 – McapMediaWire – Silo Pharma Inc. (OTCQB: SILO), a development-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the use of psychedelics as a therapeutic, today announced that it has entered into a sponsored research agreement with Columbia University pursuant to which Silo has been granted an option to license certain assets currently under development, including Alzheimer’s disease.

This agreement incorporates the work of Dr. Christine Ann Denny, an Associate Professor of Clinical Neurobiology (in Psychiatry) at Columbia University Irving Medical Center. Denny and her team are focusing their efforts on the molecular mechanisms underlying learning and memory, including diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. An estimated 5.8 million Americans, including one in ten people, age 65 and older, currently live with Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Denny’s pioneering research into whether ketamine and the novel inventions that may be licensed by Silo may improve memory retrieval, halt, or even reverse, the process of Alzheimer’s disease-related to memory loss or cognitive aging, could have life-altering implications for people suffering with everything from Alzheimer’s disease to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Eric Weisblum, CEO of Silo Pharma stated “We are excited to partner with Dr. Denny and Columbia University, a world-renowned institution that is at the forefront of research and development in this area. To be able to bring hope and possibly a therapeutic to patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease is an exciting proposition for Silo Pharma. The unique compounds being developed at Columbia have shown tremendous promise and we look forward to continuing to explore and develop these therapeutics.”

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Safe Harbour & Forward-Looking Statements:

This news release contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the “safe harbour” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are identified by the use of words “could”, “believe”, “anticipate”, “intend”, “estimate”, “expect”, “may”, “continue”, “predict”, “potential” and similar expressions that are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Such statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors that could cause the actual results of Silo Pharma, Inc. (“Silo” or “the Company”) to differ materially from the results expressed or implied by such statements, including changes to anticipated sources of revenues, future economic and competitive conditions, difficulties in developing the Company’s technology platforms, retaining and expanding the Company’s customer base, fluctuations in consumer spending on the Company’s products and other factors. Accordingly, although the Company believes that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, there can be no assurance that such expectations will prove to be correct. The Company disclaims any obligations to publicly update or release any revisions to the forward-looking information contained in this presentation, whether as a result of new information, future events, or otherwise, after the date of this presentation or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events except as required by law.

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R&D return on pharma investment picks up for the first time in six years

In 2020, projected returns on investment in research and development (R&D) for a combined cohort of 15 global pharmaceutical companies was 2.5 per cent, 0.9 percentage points higher than in 2019. This is the first sign of a reversal in the declining trend seen over the past seven years, according to research by Deloitte’s Centre for Health Solutions.

The range in performance between the top performing and bottom performing companies has narrowed, however, with all but one company having an internal rate of return (IRR) below the industry weighted average cost of capital. (The weighted average cost of capital is acknowledged by most industries as the most common discounted cash flow method to derive enterprise value.)

In 2020, the cohort saw an increase in average forecast peak sales per pipeline asset (the amount of money a drug is expected to generate annually) to $421 million, from $357 million in 2019. However, the average cost to develop an asset (bring a drug to market) increased once more to $2,442 million, up $51 million compared to 2019 and a $1,115 million increase since 2013.

The increase in costs per asset is due mainly to a fall in the overall number of assets in late stage pipelines (the final stage of R&D before a drug is launched to market) which decreased from 213 in 2019 to 207 in 2020. Between 1 May 2019 and 30 April 2020, the cohort had a total of 53 assets approved, an increase from 39 in 2019.

Deloitte also commissioned analysis measuring the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on clinical trials to investigate the likely impact on future year returns. The analysis revealed that between March and November 2020, the pandemic affected an estimated 1,210 trials across the industry. The vast majority of these (66 per cent) had delayed starts or completions; and eight per cent were terminated (permanently stopped) or withdrawn (stopped before enrolling any patients).

Colin Terry, Consulting Partner for European Life Sciences R&D at Deloitte, commented: “We are finally seeing seeds of change in the projected R&D productivity given recent progress of some novel trial designs and improvements in efficiency through the digitalisation of drug discovery and development. However, adoption continues to be experimental and not at scale across the industry, although accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic across all stakeholders and regulators. The ‘need for speed’ has become all-encompassing alongside the realisation that development cycle times need to be reduced and new ways of working embraced to finally see the industry break the trends of the last decade.”

Neil Lesser, Principal, US Life Sciences R&D Leader at Deloitte added: “While the uptick in performance is encouraging, sustaining it will require companies to continue investing in approaches that led to this positive direction. These include expanding investments in digital technologies and data science approaches, as well as increasing the use of transformative development models. The industry’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic proved that biopharma innovation can be speeded up through creative approaches to drug development – only time will tell if this progress becomes a permanent legacy.”