Dentons HPRP provides legal assistance to Amazon Data Services

Dentons HPRP has been appointed to provide legal assistance to PT Amazon Data Services Indonesia (“ADSI”). ADSI has been established as a data storage service provider in Indonesia as part of Amazon’s global expansion. Dentons HPRP will be responsible for providing legal advice and assistance in relation to projects and corporations in Indonesia.

Recently, a team from Dentons HPRP, led by Partner Hendra Ong, and supported by Associate lawyers Hapsari Arumdati and Yolla Wietanto, assisted the company in reviewing, negotiating, furnishing and executing contracts with 3 units of PT PLN (Persero) for supplying electricity to support ADSI’s business operations in Indonesia.

PT Amazon Data Services Indonesia is an Indonesian subsidiary company and a part of the corporate group Amazon.com, Inc., an American multinational technology company based in Seattle and the world’s largest online marketplace.

As a leading law firm with wide-ranging and in-depth knowledge in business and corporate actions, Dentons HPRP has been providing strategic advisory and comprehensive legal assistance to corporations in their businesses in Indonesia. For more details on our services, please contact the partner listed under the key contact.

Dentons HPRP: Uninterrupted Service during COVID-19 Outbreak

Dentons HPRP has adopted remote working since 18 March 2020, in compliance with the direction of the President of Indonesia on Sunday, 15 March 2020 and Circular Letter of The Minister of Manpower of Indonesia regarding Worker / Labour Protection and Business Continuity in the Context of Preventing and Countering COVID-19, announced on 17 March 2020.

This will continue.

Following the announcement by the Governor of DKI Jakarta no.33/2020 regarding Large Scale Social Restrictions (Pembatasan Sosial Berskala Besar or PSBB) to contain the spread of COVID-19, our office (at Wisma 46 – Kota BNI, 32nd and 41st floors, Jl. Jend. Sudirman Kav.1, Jakarta 10220) will be closed from 13 April 2020 to 24 April 2020, both dates inclusive.

As a global firm, we are accustomed to working virtually and have extensive technology at our disposal to enable our teams to continue providing services to our clients without interruption. We also continue to process mail correspondence and service of documents during this period. Please contact our office at +62 21 5701837 for the necessary arrangements.

Minimising disruption to our clients is our top-most priority as we understand that many of you will have questions on how the outbreak will impact you and how we can help. Please do not hesitate to contact the relevant partners or associates by email or mobile phone. We will make every effort to support your business and your needs for legal services during this period.

Dentons has also developed a comprehensive, regularly updated COVID-19 hub which houses a wealth of resources to help navigate the ongoing challenges during this difficult time. We invite you to access this hub for further insights.

We thank you for your continued support. Should you have any queries, please do not hesitate to be in touch with us.

We wish you and your families good health.

About Dentons

Dentons is the world’s largest law firm, delivering quality and value to clients around the globe. Dentons is a leader on the Acritas Global Elite Brand Index, a BTI Client Service 30 Award winner and recognised by prominent business and legal publications for its innovations in client service, including founding Nextlaw Enterprise, Dentons’ wholly owned subsidiary of innovation, advisory and technology operating units. Dentons’ polycentric approach, commitment to inclusion and diversity and world-class talent challenge the status quo to advance client interests in the communities in which we live and work.

Shoosmiths wins panel appointment from Odeon Cinemas

UK law firm Shoosmiths has secured a place on Odeon Cinemas’ revised legal roster – and will provide corporate work to the national chain for the next two years.

Odeon Cinemas has reduced the number of law firms it works with from ten to three.

Odeon’s client partner Paul Batchelor said: “This is a great result for our corporate division, and Shoosmiths, to secure a spot on this large corporate group’s panel.

“We’re delighted to be continuing our relationship with Odeon and look forward to working with them for the next two years.”

Odeon Cinemas’ Group Chief Legal & Compliance Officer Chris Thomas said: We’ve been impressed with the support and advice from Shoosmiths and we are pleased that relationship will be ongoing. We look forward to working with Paul and the rest of the team at Shoosmiths.

Browne Jacobson appoints new IT Director

Law firm Browne Jacobson has announced that it has appointed Abby Ewen as its new IT Director.

Working closely with Iain Blatherwick, Managing Partner, and the Firm’s Executive Board, Abby will head up the firm’s award winning IT team.

The role will see her utilising her extensive strategic and operational expertise in developing and driving forward the firm’s technology strategy and spearheading an effective IT service, focused on delivering business efficiencies, technology driven solutions and exceptional client service for both end users and clients.

Abby will be the firm’s first female IT director, following on from Caroline Green’s recent appointment as the firm’s first female Senior Partner. Abby’s appointment increases the number of women on Browne Jacobson’s Executive to five of the eleven members.

She joins from law firm BLM where she was IT Director for more than six years. Prior to her time at BLM, Abby held various senior IT and change management positions over 10 years with law firm Simmons and Simmons.

As well as being a regular speaker at high profile industry events, Abby actively promotes the technology sector as an attractive career option to school children in her role as a STEM ambassador. She is also a Director of LITIG (Legal IT Innovators Group) and a member of the advisory panel at DELTAS – a group that promotes diversity & excellence in legal technology and security.

Speaking on her appointment Managing Partner Iain Blatherwick, said:

“We are delighted to have someone with Abby’s experience join us.

“She will play a crucial role in helping us to deliver our vision and strategy, drive business performance and create a high-performance culture and environment where talented people from diverse backgrounds are motivated and thrive.

“Abby’s appointment is a real coup for the business.

“She has an impressive track record and she will be joining a strong team that has been core to helping to meet the current and future commercial needs of the business.”

On joining Browne Jacobson, Abby Ewen commented:

“It is a really exciting time to be joining Browne Jacobson.

“I have been really impressed with the investment the firm has made in recent years and their vision for placing IT at the heart of their strategy for future growth.

“I am looking forward to using my experience to develop a best in class IT team and take advantage of the technological developments in the market to provide a truly unique experience for both its people and clients.”

If you would like to find out more information, please visit: https://www.brownejacobson.com/

Five must-dos when designing a law firm workplace

Law firms are placing ever-increasing importance on thoughtful workplace design to attract and retain top talent, making every office build-out or renovation a critical opportunity to win the talent war. With millennials expected to comprise 75 percent of the workforce by 2030, law firm design trends are being driven by an evolving culture that prioritises individual workplace experiences, health and well-being and ubiquitous technology.

The future of law firm design is rooted in change. Designers are not just designers anymore—they’re change management consultants. Architects and contractors often work with law firms’ human resources teams, facilities managers and the lawyers themselves to align the existing workforce culture with a realistic design approach. In doing so, five considerations are typically front-of-mind, if not mandatory.

1. Recruitment & Retention of the Next Attorney Generation

Just because you build it, doesn’t mean they will come (or stay), and one size does not fit all. It boils down to getting to know your people, recognising the culture and understanding the aspirations of young attorneys moving up in the workplace before applying something across the board.

For example, the idea behind open office workstations for attorneys is rooted in thoughtful cost reduction, however there are many factors that influence whether that may or may not work, including the ever-present client confidentiality factor (both from an acoustical standpoint and from a visual standpoint) and requisite privacy.

Junior-level attorneys still view the location and size of their office, and migrating from a smaller to a larger office, as a reflection of professional progress. They aspire to the highly coveted “corner office” or larger office. It seems that private offices, whether varied in size or a universal size, are a permanent fixture in law firms for myriad reasons.

A modern alternative to open officing that promotes connectedness and increases workforce facetime is the increasing application of an intercommunicating stair. Rather than a library, additional secretarial space or mock trial rooms, law firms installing a communicating stair between floors are attempting to align themselves with the collaborative nature of tech firms and corporate HQs.

2. The Workplace Experience for the Individual

While the value proposition of a dedicated private office is still strong in law firms, attorneys appreciate having choices or offices available to them outside of the four walls of their office. If the technology is available to support them, attorneys are placing more value on breakaway spaces in which to work in a collaborative setting or in an environment that is still solitary but in a different footprint, such as a comfortable-yet-functional indoor “lounge” space or outdoor space for mild weather. It has become necessary to provide law firm attorneys and staff with options to show consideration of the individual workplace experience.

Given the tremendous pressure placed on attorneys to maximise billable hours, the more opportunities they are given to leave their desks, work solitarily in a different room surrounded by something different on the wall or a different colour, with different acoustics or even meet in a small room or hang out in the café, the better.

3. Health & Well-being in a Demanding Workplace

Wellness is paramount for overworked law firm attorneys and staff. While the legal industry has historically been a slow adopter of modern office trends, it’s taking a step forward in wellness. Law firms are showing greater sensitivity to nutrition through a fresh market kind of approach, offering fruit, yogurt and different water options as opposed to soda and candy bars in vending machines. Many new law firm offices feature yoga and retreat rooms, which are only starting to be featured in other markets.

Perhaps most significantly, many law firms are creating a director of well-being role, charged with cultivating a healthy work environment and helping drive work life balance initiatives. Well known for their long hours and the struggle to maintain work life balance, law firms, beginning with office design decisions, must adopt more sensitive and thoughtful initiatives that contribute to the well-being of their people. This will help to avoid the increased trend of younger associates burning out and leaving the industry for good.

4. The Power of Ubiquitous Tech

In order to achieve work-life balance, law firms must create and follow through on work-remote policies. To successfully support such a policy, firms need a strong technology infrastructure. Ubiquitous technology is the idea that attorneys and law firm staff can be technologically supported both internally in the workplace and externally outside of the office.

Although client confidentiality concerns preclude certain platforms and technologies from being stored on the cloud, ubiquitous technology holds law firms accountable to make investments on speedy infrastructure previously limited due to operational cost controls.

In 2005, large law firms invested in technology in their conference centres, but not on the work floor. Now they are spending more throughout their spaces on AV because it’s critical to their business. Tenant workplace investment has shifted away from high-end finishes, millwork and stone to greater investment in technology and glass facades that introduce light to the interior desks sitting just outside of the perimeter office landscape.

This shift over the past 10 to 15 years means technology infrastructure improvements now represent 40 to 45 percent of the tenant improvement factor. Response time, client accommodation, speed and access are so paramount to the business that without this reallocation of investment, law firms will fall drastically behind.

5. Future-Proof Updates

Future-proofing a law firm is more possible than ever, but it requires clients to spend a great deal of time planning and analysing what role the workplace will need to serve seven to eight years into a lease term. Firms must budget accordingly to accommodate the impact of fool proof flexibility. Potential growth, staff increases, space decreases, infrastructure concerns with shifting technology and future density must all be taken into account to minimise capital expenditure over the lease term.

If possible, companies should utilise a modular approach to allow for inexpensive future changes, budget accordingly and plan for what-if factors. Firms must consider the repercussions of changes; for example, what elements would be costly to move if a wall comes down, such as a sprinkler system, and which are more flexible, such as lighting?

Traditionally, law firms renew office leases in older buildings that contain perimeter private offices and only think about future changes in carpet and paint. But, older buildings are optimal in allowing firms to build out using modules to accommodate future change with minimal impact, maintaining the traditional perimeter-office style and allowing for increased collaboration space in the core.

With the one-attorney-to-one-secretary ratio nearly obsolete, using glass as private office facades to shed light into the interior space is not as important as it was 10 years ago. The next big question in law firm design is: how do you make that interior zone experience as welcoming and desirable as that coveted perimeter?

As law firms prepare for a workforce centred on factors such as connectivity, flexibility and wellness, their workplace must reflect that shifting dynamic and be able to continually evolve. By working with their design and construction teams, firm HR and facilities leadership can create office spaces that reflect their future-focused culture.

Kirkland & Ellis kicks off wellbeing program

Kirkland & Ellis announced this week the creation of a new firmwide wellness program with a new director, part of the ongoing efforts by Big Law to tackle mental health issues that plague the legal profession.

Robin Belleau will be Kirkland & Ellis’ first firmwide director of well-being. A former assistant state’s attorney turned counselor, Belleau officially joined the firm back in March.

She is the former executive director of the Lawyers’ Assistance Program in Illinois and is a member of the advisory commission of the American Bar Association’s Commission on Lawyers’ Assistance Programs.

Kirkland’s new program will proactively work with its attorneys and staff on issues related to mental health and substance misuse and will offer education and enhanced dialogue across three core areas: resilience, connection and fitness and nutrition.

As a part of the program, the firm will host educational courses and seminars on well-being. It will also introduce two well-being apps that aim to support stress reduction, increase resiliency and support individuals in combating substance abuse and other addictive behaviors. The firm will also launch an internal website that will provide its employees with additional resources.

“One of the main goals is to start this conversation and help reduce the stigma around people having mental health issues or substance misuse issues,” Belleau said.

The wellness program will help identify paths to support individuals dealing with substance abuse issues and other mental health concerns rampant in the legal profession like depression, stress or anxiety.

“Kirkland is committed to supporting the well-being of our attorneys. This initiative is something lawyers, particularly younger lawyers and law students, throughout the legal community are asking of their law firms,” said chairman of Kirkland’s global management executive committee Jeffrey C. Hammes in a statement.

“We are embracing the call for a more open and transparent dialog about mental health within our profession, and believe this program will become an important part of our culture,” he added.

Kirkland’s new program is just the latest initiative offered by law firms to help their attorneys and staff deal with the pressures within the profession. Earlier this year, Morgan Lewis & Bockius launched a new initiative “ML Well” and added its first-ever director of employee well-being. Reed Smith launched a firmwide program “Wellness Works” to support the health and well-being of its lawyers and staff.

And in addition to its “Be Well” program, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld added an on-site counselor to its Washington office to provide therapy sessions its attorneys one day a week. Hogan Lovells has had on-site psychologists available at some of its offices for several years.

According to a 2016 American Bar Association study of lawyers, 28 percent dealt with depression and 19 percent dealt with anxiety. Between 21 and 36 percent were “problem drinkers.”

“People want to work on their mental health,” Belleau said. “Even though there’s still stigma attached to issues, its moving along the spectrum.”