The 10 best universities to study business

Think you could be the next Mark Zuckerberg? If you have a mind for innovation and business, you might benefit from a degree at one of the finest business schools in the UK.

Most business courses give students a thorough understanding of business theory, economics, entrepreneurship, accounting, management and business law.

As such a diverse degree course, Business Management can open doors to a multitude of careers. Upon graduation, you could find a job as a business adviser, a data analyst, investment banker, human resources officer, stockbroker or even join the team of a new start-up.

Here, we have compiled a list of the best business degree courses in the UK, including information on entry requirements, course details and the most advantageous features. The following are the 10 best universities to study Business & Management, according to the latest 2020 league table from Complete University Guide, which ranks universities according to their entry standards, student satisfaction, research quality and graduate prospects.

10. University of Lancaster

The course: The Business Management BSc incorporates modules from every department within the Management School. In first year, all students cover accounting, marketing, management and business analysis. In second year, you expand on this knowledge and study operations management, economics and entrepreneurship, including modules in management decision making and spreadsheet modelling. There are optional modules in further economics, marketing and entrepreneurship, which you take into your third and final year. You juggle these subjects with a core module on strategic management.

Biggest advantage: All students have access to a Business Management Careers Coach, who will run sessions on CVs and the skills that you will need in the workplace.

9. Durham University

The course: In the first year of the Business and Management BA, you develop a business plan for a start-up and take optional modules in business, economics or a language. In second year, you further develop your investigative and business skills and take modules on information systems and the management of operations, as well as optional modules in accounting, entrepreneurship, marketing and business law. In your final year, you focus on a double-weighted dissertation and a core module in strategic management, as well as optional modules.

Biggest advantage: Students can take the Year Abroad or a Year In Industry programme, either of which could boost your employment prospects.

8. University of Warwick

The course: On the first year of the Management BSc course, you study the basics of business management – including economics, marketing, financial management, strategy, organisations and business analytics. In second year, there are electives to choose from, alongside core modules in international business, operations management and entrepreneurship. In third year, you have the option to take a Year In Industry. Alternatively, you can go straight into your final year, where you will study critical issues in management and a range of optional modules.

Biggest advantage: This course is flexible, and you can specialise in specific areas (such as finance or marketing) in your final two years. Modules are varied and include marketing, auditing, supply chain management, business law, risk management and team leadership.

7. University of Strathclyde

The course: In the first three years of the the Management BA, you take classes in business alongside the Management Development Programme (MDP). In the first year of the MDP, you focus on theory, including disruptive technologies, business ethics and creativity and responsibility. You also take a module called Managing in a Global Context. In the second year of the MDP, you study global business, the Third Sector, oratory and more. You also take modules in strategy, analysis and change within organisations. In third year, you undertake a work placement, complete the final year of the MDP and take core modules in management practice. In the fourth year, students cover management, the global economy, strategy and ethical leadership.

Biggest advantage: On the third year of the MDP, there are four options for how you can put your knowledge into practice. You can take an internship, work on two live consultancy projects, go on an international exchange, or conduct problem-solving projects with other students.

6. University of Leeds

The course: On the first year of the Business Management MA, you cover economics, accounting and organisational behaviour. You also take the Exploring Your Potential module, where you assess your own managerial skills. In second year, you study the basics of marketing and managing people and operations, develop your research and analytical skills and learn to consider social responsibility. In your third year, you further develop your management skills in modules on strategic management and leadership, and you can take optional modules in employment law, technology, international business and advertising. There is also a dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Biggest advantage: There’s a real emphasis on developing leadership qualities on this course, with modules on strategic leadership and management. In addition, if you choose (and pass) the Contemporary Management Consulting module in your third year, you can register with the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and gain the CMI Level 5 Certificate in Professional Consulting.

5. King’s College London

The course: The Business Management BSc at King’s College London is a comprehensive course. In your first year, there are 12 core modules, covering economics, financial reporting, business ethics, accounting and marketing. In second year, you are taught research methods, international business, strategic management and take optional modules. There is also the option to study abroad either in the first term of second year or for the entire academic year. In third year, there are no core modules so you can choose specialisms, including employment law, leadership, banking and managerial economics.

Biggest advantage: Located in the heart of London, King’s Business School is close to the Square Mile (the hub of international commerce and finance) and a few tube stops away from Canary Wharf.

4. University of Loughborough

The course: In the first and second years of the BSc Management degree you are introduced to the core business and management topics, including business economics, financial reporting, marketing, human resource management, accounting, data analysis, business ethics and operations management. There are also optional modules. In your third year, you can either study abroad or take a work placement. In your fourth and final year, you study three core modules on decision-making, leadership and global strategy, and select optional modules.

Biggest advantage: If you go on a Year Abroad or work placement in your third year, you receive an extra qualification: a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) if you do a work placement or a Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) if you study abroad. Alternatively, you can split your third year and spend six months studying abroad and six months on a work placement.

3. University of Exeter

The course: In the first year of the Business and Management BSc, you mainly cover the theory of business management, with classes on accounting, statistics, economics, marketing, management and the relationship between business and society. In the second year, you take core modules in accounting, human resource management, consumer behaviour, operations management and organisations. There are more optional modules in second year than first, but even more to choose from in your third and final year of study. In final year, there are just two core modules, covering finance and strategic management.

Biggest advantage: There is an optional Year Abroad or Year in Industry work placement.

2. University of Bath

The course: In the first year of the Management BSc, you get to grips with the basics of business management – including accounting, business economics, international business, management, finance and marketing. In second year, you study more specific topics, such as business law, consumer psychology, entrepreneurship and managing a multinational enterprise. There are optional modules in both second and third year, covering E-business, corporate responsibility, UK tax and conducting business in China, to name a few. In third year you also study international strategy and complete an entrepreneurship project.

Biggest advantage: The entrepreneurship project in your final year allows you to apply your knowledge to a practical assignment. This module requires teamwork, identifying a suitable gap in the market and planning how you would build your own business.

1. University of St Andrews

The course: During the first two years of this four-year course, you will take Management modules alongside at least one other subject. Typical Management topics include the role of managers within organisations and the role of organisations within society. In your final two years you can take more optional modules, including (bit not limited to): advertising, corporate social responsibility, entrepreneurship, human resource management, sustainable development and international banking.

Biggest advantage: This flexible course will make you more of an all-rounder as you are required to study two additional subjects in your first year and at least one in your second year. This could give you the chance to develop your languages skills, for instance.

England Rugby - Old Mutual Wealth

Old Mutual plans to grow Financial Adviser School

Old Mutual Wealth intends to scale up its Financial Adviser School (FAS) to help close the advice gap.

Richard Freeman, chief distribution officer at Old Mutual Wealth, who presented eight graduates with their graduation certificates at a ceremony explained he would like to see hundreds of students coming through the school eventually.

He added the school, which was originally set up by Sesame Bankhall, should appeal to people from “right across the board” as it recruited more students, including those who had left the armed services and others from outside the financial services industry.

The Financial Adviser School received 319 enquiries and 90 applications by the end of the first quarter of 2017, and currently has 37 students, the average age of which is 27.

Mr Freeman said: “I think at the moment it is a tiny part [of closing the advice gap] but we can scale this up.”

Darren Smith, head of the Financial Adviser School, said attracting more women and introducing financial services to them as a career option was a key focus for him.

According to Old Mutual Wealth, 29 per cent of the Financial Adviser School students are women.

Eleanor Armson was among the eight who graduated earlier this week and one of two female graduates.

When asked why she chose to study at the school, she said she was not just looking for a job when she applied but a career in financial advice.

“We knew where we were going, and there was a clear path. That is kind of what appealed to me about it,” she added.

Ms Armson, who studied for a degree in English and Film before going on to work in recruitment for a while, also acknowledged the school’s focus on attracting more women into the industry.

“I think it’s a great industry for women and it’s a great opportunity to get into finance as well,” she suggested.

“I think it’s one of those industries that is really suited to women as well because it plays to their strengths.”

Having completed the course, Ms Armson said she is going to be working for Old Mutual Wealth Private Client Advisers, which is a sponsor of the school.

Mr Smith said: “The great thing about that is we have a friendly sponsor who we continue to get feedback from on how we adapt the programme.”

From May 2017, the course offered by the school will run in line with the government’s apprenticeship model, which will see the course extended from 47 to 58 weeks.

Mr Freeman believed the apprenticeship model was a “great initiative” from government.

He said the school could also expand by offering a chartered course and a paraplanner course.

“So people can come in at different levels, different costs, different courses,” he added. “We’re not just teaching financial advice. I think that’s probably next year.”

Old Mutual Wealth-backed network Intrinsic completed the acquisition of Sesame’s Financial Adviser School in February 2016.

Intrinsic reached a provisional agreement in late 2015 to acquire the school, which was founded by Sesame Bankhall Group in 2011, after the latter opted to wind down the training academy as part of a strategic review.

It was also announced this week Cara Gilbert had become the youngest person in the country to complete the diploma in financial planning from the Personal Finance Society.

Ms Gilbert, who is 19 years old, completed the qualification while working full-time at Standard Life’s Edinburgh office for the past two years.

She said: “I knew that I wanted to work in the financial sector when I was at school. I enjoyed maths, business management and accounting subjects.”

For more information about Old Mutual Wealth, please visit https://www.oldmutualwealth.co.uk/

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Southern Careers Institute Overview

Southern Careers Institute has maintained a tradition of career training for over 50 years. With campuses in Austin, Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Harlingen, Pharr, San Antonio, Waco, and Online, SCI has made it our mission to provide our students with employer-tailored programs designed to make our graduates the most marketable in the industry.

About SCI Programs

Southern Careers Institute’s trade school programs in Texas can help you breakthrough into a rewarding career and succeed in today’s demanding marketplace.

Our courses are all built from an employer’s point of view with the career skills and certifications they’re looking for in their next hire. Students who enroll in our medical, business, cosmetology and trades training programs become more marketable than the competition as our programs are designed to make students eligible for recognized certifications, to connect them to employers with electronic profiles on our SCI Connect platform, and to further demonstrate career skills with verifiable SCI Connect Badges that demonstrate skills employers need.

At Southern Careers Institute, we offer a variety of trade courses that can lead to rewarding careers in a variety of fields. Our admissions staff is dedicated to matching your unique personality with the career training program that is the right fit for you. We are committed to stimulating, motivating, and educating our students to prepare them for their new life in a new field have dedicated Educational, Student and Career Services that are here to help.

If you would like more information about Southern Careers Institute, please click on the following link: https://scitexas.edu/

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Memphis educators recognised for excellence at award ceremony

THE New Memphis Institute has kicked off a special program to award distinguished teachers and school leaders in the city’s highest needs schools.

Recipients of the New Memphis Institute Educators of Excellence Award were recently honoured at a luncheon with a panel of Memphis’ top education leaders, including Shelby County Schools Superintendent Dorsey Hopson and Achievement School District Superintendent Sharon Griffin. This effort is part of New Memphis’ leadership program that works to attract, develop, activate and retain talent in Memphis.

“Educators are a vital strata of talent in our city that often goes under acknowledged. At New Memphis, we believe it is essential to recognise the contribution of our best educators, to learn from their experiences, and to support them in their growth,” said Nancy Coffee, New Memphis President and CEO.

Five graduates of the New Memphis program made the inaugural list of 2018 honourees and each received a $1,500 check. The recipients are:

Rebecca Bowers – Category: Teacher – Rebecca currently teaches 3rd grade at Kingsbury Elementary. She is the grade level chair, serves on her school’s instructional leadership team and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Auburn University with a degree in Early Childhood Education. Rebecca has seven years of service and is a Memphis Teacher Residency mentor.

James Johnson – Category: Teacher – James currently teaches Science at Chickasaw Middle School. He serves as the science department chair, student council advisor and track coach. He has also worked a diversity, equity and inclusion coach at Teach for America’s regional institute for several years. James has seven years of service, is a Teach for America – Memphis alumnus and a former Student Government Association President at the University of Memphis.

Kevin Kimberly – Category: Instructional Staff – Kevin currently works as a development coach at Perea Elementary and a Chief Educational Consultant at ForwardEd Consulting. A former middle and high school principal at Memphis Catholic, Kevin has seven years of experience and completed his Master’s in Education at the University of Notre Dame.

Tamera Malone – Category: Instructional Staff – Tamera currently works as an instructional coach at Gestalt Public Schools and previously worked as a middle school teacher and special education teacher. Tamera completed her Masters in Teacher Education, Special Education at the University of Memphis and is currently completing her Doctorate at U of M in Instruction & Curriculum. Tamera has nine years of experience, is a graduate of UT – Knoxville and served on the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s National Teacher Advisory Council.

Jeffrey Veale, Jr. – Category: School Administrator – Jeffrey currently works as the School Director at Leadership Preparatory Charter School but previously taught 3rd grade mathematics at Ford Road Elementary in the Innovation Zone. He has been recognised with the 2012-13 Most Effective First Year Teacher award and the 2012-13 Featured Teacher for Elementary Effective Practice conference. He also worked for four years in operations leadership at Teach for America-Memphis regional institute.

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Oxford and Cambridge top the list of best universities in the world

The UK is still home to the top two universities in the world, according to the 2018 Times Higher Education World University Rankings.

Oxford University is on top for the third consecutive year, while Cambridge keeps its second best position for the second year in a row.

However, UK is no longer the second most-represented nation in the rankings. Despite the UK having 98 institutions in the full list of 1,258, it loses its spot to Japan which claims 103 positions. The UK does however retain its status as second most-represented in the top 200.

The US’s Stanford University completes the top three, maintaining it position from last year. The US still leads the way as most-represented with 172 institutions in the list.

This year’s ranking see the University of Dundee and Royal Holloway slipping out of the global 200.

China’s new top university, Tsinghua, claims 25th spot, and overtakes the UK’s LSE for, which falls one spot to 26, and the University of Edinburgh which drops from joint 27 to 29.

There are a number of climbers in the UK, with University College London rising two spots to number 14, and the University of Warwick scaling 12 places to joint 79th.

The University of Birmingham jumps 25 positions to joint 116, while the University of Aberdeen leaps 27 positions to 158th.

Phil Baty, editorial director of the global rankings, said: ‘We see some individual stars in the UK this year, but the broader national data story is really one of stagnation and modest decline, with the UK taking a minor hit to its research reputation.

‘We can only speculate at this stage as to any connection with Brexit, the risk, however, to the UK’s reputation and research capabilities from its separation with Europe is very real.

‘The ground-breaking work of UK universities mustn’t be undermined by complacency and politicking.

‘To ensure they continue to thrive on the global stage, positive immigration and investment policies are crucial.

They must be free to attract and retain the very best international talent and international students post-Brexit, and they must be protected from cuts, the flow of research funding and academic talent mustn’t be impacted.

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Why an MBA still trumps a master’s in finance in banking

A decade ago, an MBA was clearly the top qualification to have if you wanted to start down the path toward a high-level job in banking. Then quietly, more top business schools began offering an alternative: the cheaper, more technical master’s in finance degree. By 2015, hiring totals suggested that a master’s in finance may actually have trumped the MBA as the top qualification. However, new data shows that MBA programs may be having a renaissance of sorts, at least when it comes to compensation.

Comparing salary expectations for MBA holders versus those with a master’s in finance is a difficult task. While MBA programs usually require some previous professional experience, you can often enter a master’s in finance program directly from undergraduate studies. This means an MBA should demand a higher starting salary than a master’s degree, and in fact it does. But MBA holders are also now seeing greater increases in salary post-graduation than they did previously. The picture is more muddled for recent master’s of finance graduates.

The average degree holder at eight of the top 15 master’s in finance programs recently ranked by the FT reported lower annual salaries after three years of experience than those who graduated one year earlier. This only occurred with two of the top 15 global MBA programs – IESE Business School in Spain and the University of Cambridge, both of which ranked outside the top 10.

Meanwhile, graduates of every top 15 MBA program but one reported at least a 100% increase in salary from the time they entered the program to three years after earning their degree. Even graduates from IESE and Cambridge Judge saw their salaries more than double over that period. That’s a stark difference from just a few years earlier, when graduates of every top MBA program reported three-year salary increases that were lower percentage-wise than the previous year. The value of an MBA appears to be on the rise.

When it came to the Masters in Finance courses where students didn’t have prior professional experience, the FT compared the starting salaries directly following graduation to what degree holders were making after three years. Among top schools, graduates from first-ranked HEC Paris saw the biggest three-year salary bump of 82%. The master’s program at the U.K.’s Imperial College Business School fared the worst, with graduates only earning a 43% increase in pay over three years. Imperial College alumni from 2015 now earn an average of $92k, meaning their starting salary was around $65k after graduation. At HEC, it was around $75k.

For MBAs, sticking around pays

There are several possible explanations for the new narrative that top MBAs are still a good deal. A masters qualification is well-aligned with lucrative sales and trading jobs, fewer of which exist now than in years previous. And of course, not as many MBAs enter banking as often as in previous years; many now take jobs in tech and consulting, so pay could be rising due to scarcity value. But the data seems to reject the premise that other industries are out-paying finance professionals, particularly in the early years for those who went to top schools.

Business schools that are the chief feeders into finance – Stanford, Wharton, Booth, Harvard and Stern – all saw their graduates who remained in the industry take home bigger salaries than those who left or never entered finance in the first place. Graduates of all five with the exception of Stern earned salaries north of $200k if they stuck around for three years.

Banks are thirsty for masters candidates

Perhaps the best news for master’s of finance grads is that they are clearly in high demand. Over 95% of students from nine of the top 10 programs had a job within three months of graduation, with four schools sporting 100% employment rates. For top MBA programs, the highest employment rate was 95% (Booth), while several languished in the 80%-90% range.

If you have little or no experience, a master’s in finance appears a near-lock to find a decent job in the industry. But it still pays to have an MBA. You just need to land a job first and handle the culture of banking for more than a couple years.